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U.S. consumer prices rose 0.2 percent in February | TribLIVE.com
U.S./World

U.S. consumer prices rose 0.2 percent in February

Associated Press
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AP
Shoppers walk through the isles at a Walmart Supercenter in Houston. On Tuesday, March 12, 2019, the Labor Department reports on U.S. consumer prices for February.

WASHINGTON — U.S. consumer prices rose 0.2 percent in February, pushed up slightly by higher gasoline and housing costs even as the prices for autos and clothing slumped.

The Labor Department said Tuesday that the consumer price index rose a modest 1.5 percent last month from a year ago.

Inflation has been muted despite the solid job market, causing average hourly earnings — after being adjusted for consumer prices — to climb 1.9 percent in the past year. This marks the strongest inflation-adjusted wage growth since November 2015, an increase that would likely help consumer spending and economic growth. The low level of inflation also gives the Federal Reserve more flexibility in holding off on further increases to a key short-term interest rate, enabling the U.S. central bank to provide support for economic growth.

Still, many Americans face higher prices for basic necessities. Housing costs continue to outpace overall inflation, rising 3.4 percent from a year ago. School tuition and child care costs have increased 3 percent over the past 12 months. Food prices jumped 0.4 percent in February.

Gasoline prices surged 1.5 percent in February, but they’re 9.1 percent lower from last year. Clothing prices plunged 1 percent in February, while new-auto prices slipped 0.2 percent.

Excluding the volatile energy and food categories, core prices increased 0.1 percent in February and 2.1 percent from a year ago.

Categories: Business | World
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