U.S. commemorates 9/11 as its aftermath extends, evolves | TribLIVE.com
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U.S. commemorates 9/11 as its aftermath extends, evolves

Associated Press
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A U.S. flag hanging from a steel girder, damaged in the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center, blows in the breeze Wednesday at a memorial in Jersey City, N.J., as the sun rises behind One World Trade Center building and the re-developed area where the Twin Towers of World Trade Center once stood in New York City on the 18th anniversary of the attacks.
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Visitors gather May 15, 2015, near the pools at the 9/11 Memorial in New York. As they have done 17 times before, a crowd of victims’ relatives is expected at the site on Wednesday to observe the anniversary the deadliest terror attack on American soil.
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Visitors look at the waterfalls Sept. 9, 2015, at the World Trade Center Memorial in New York. As they have done 17 times before, a crowd of victims’ relatives is expected at the site on Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2019 to observe the anniversary the deadliest terror attack on American soil.
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New York City firefighters stand at attention Wednesday in front of a memorial on the side of a firehouse adjacent to One World Trade Center and the 9/11 Memorial site during ceremonies commemorating the 18th anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks in New York.
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A view of the World Trade Center cite on Sept. 9, 2019. Wednesday marks the 18th anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks against the United States.
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New York Fire Department members attend a second funeral service Tuesday for FDNY firefighter Michael Haub in Franklin Square, N.Y. The firefighter from Long Island who died in the World Trade Center attacks was remembered for a second time on the eve of the 18th anniversary of 9/11. Last week, the New York City medical examiner identified more of his remains recovered at ground zero.
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Firefighters work on Sept. 11, 2001, beneath the destroyed mullions, the vertical struts that once faced the outer walls of the World Trade Center towers, after a terrorist attack on the twin towers in New York.
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A woman wipes away tears Wednesday as she stands next to the north pool prior to a ceremony marking the 18th anniversary of the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001 at the National September 11 Memorial in New York.

NEW YORK — Americans commemorated 9/11 with solemn ceremonies and vows Wednesday to “never forget” 18 years after the deadliest terror attack on American soil.

Victims’ relatives assembled at ground zero, where the observance began with a moment of silence and the tolling of bells at 8:46 a.m. — the moment a hijacked plane slammed into the World Trade Center’s north tower.

“As long as the city will gift us this moment, I will be here,” Margie Miller, who lost her husband, Joel, said at the ceremony, which she attends every year. “I want people to remember.”

After so many years of anniversaries, she has come to know other victims’ relatives and to appreciate being with them.

“There’s smiles in between the tears that say we didn’t do this journey on our own. That we were here for each other. And that’s the piece that I think we get from being here,” she said.

President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump led a moment of silence on the White House South Lawn.

Trump then joined the military in observing a moment of silence at the Pentagon for the 18th anniversary of 9/11.

The moment of silence is traditionally observed at 9:37 a.m. — the exact time when a plane crashed into the Defense Department’s headquarters on Sept. 11, 2001, killing 184 people. But this year’s ceremony ran late, and the anniversary was observed at 9:47 a.m.

The commander in chief told families that “this is your anniversary of personal and permanent loss” and he said that their “loved ones will never ever be forgotten.”

When he arrived at the Pentagon, he was greeted by Defense Secretary Mark Esper. The president placed a wreath of red, white and blue flowers at the memorial site.

Vice President Mike Pence was scheduled to speak at the third crash site, near Shanksville.

Former President George W. Bush, commander in chief at the time of the 2001 attacks, was due at an afternoon wreath-laying at the Pentagon.

The nation is still grappling with the aftermath of 9/11. The effects are visible from airport security checkpoints to Afghanistan, where the post-9/11 U.S. invasion has become America’s longest war.

Earlier this week, Trump called off a secret meeting at Camp David with Taliban and Afghan government leaders and declared the peace talks “dead.” As the Sept. 11 anniversary began in Afghanistan, a rocket exploded at the U.S. Embassy just after midnight.

The anniversary ceremonies center on remembering the nearly 3,000 people killed when hijacked planes slammed into the trade center, the Pentagon and a field near Shanksville on Sept. 11, 2001.

All those victims’ names are read aloud at the ground zero ceremony by loved ones — now, quite often, ones too young to have known their lost relatives.

“Uncle Joey, I wish I got to know you,” Joseph Henry said of his uncle and namesake, firefighter Joseph Patrick Henry. “I know that you’re watching over us right now.”

Others made a point of spotlighting the suffering of another group of people tied to the tragedy: firefighters, police and others who died or fell ill after exposure to the wreckage and the toxins unleashed in it.

“As we honor and remember all those who died on 9/11 and their families, let us not forget the first responders who have died since 9/11 and their families,” Maureen Pulia said after reading names at ground zero. Her cousin Thomas Anthony Casoria, a firefighter, was killed there.

A compensation fund for people with potentially Sept. 11-related health problems has awarded more than $5.5 billion so far. More than 51,000 people have applied. Over the summer, Congress made sure the fund won’t run dry.

The sick gained new recognition this year at the memorial plaza at ground zero, where the new 9/11 Memorial Glade was dedicated this spring.

Sept. 11 is known not only as a day for remembrance and patriotism, but also as a day of service. People around the country volunteer at food banks, schools, home-building projects, park cleanups and other charitable endeavors on and near the anniversary.

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