Unopened 1987 Nintendo video game could sell for $10,000 | TribLIVE.com
U.S./World

Unopened 1987 Nintendo video game could sell for $10,000

Associated Press
1482259_web1_AP1921266427684
AP
In this June 15, 2019 photo provided by Heritage Auctions, Scott Amos, along with his wife, Kristy, and daughters Grace, left, and Katie, pose in Reno, Nev., with an unopened copy of a 1987 cult-classic video game “Kid Icarus.” The boxed game cartridge, still in the bag with the receipt for $38.45 from J.C. Penney’s catalog department three decades earlier, is expected to sell for up to $10,000 at an online auction with Heritage Auctions.

RENO, Nev. — An unopened copy of a 1987 cult-classic video game that a Nevada man found in the attic of his childhood home is expected to sell for up to $10,000 at an online auction.

The boxed game cartridge of Nintendo’s “Kid Icarus” was still in the bag with the receipt for $38.45 from J.C. Penney’s catalog department three decades earlier.

Scott Amos of Reno told the Reno Gazette Journal he initially thought it might be worth a couple hundred dollars.

But Valarie McLeckie, video game consignment director at Heritage Auctions, says it’s one of the hardest Nintendo titles to find in sealed condition. She says there are fewer than 10 in the hands of vintage game collectors.

“To find a sealed copy ‘in the wild,’ so to speak, not to mention one in such a nice condition and one with such transparent provenance, is both an unusual and rather historic occurrence,” she said. “We feel that the provenance will add a significant premium for serious collectors.”

Wata Games, a video game grading service, gave Amos’ copy a rating of 8.0 on a 10-point scale.

Amos said no one in the family has a recollection of purchasing the game, but the Dec. 8, 1988, purchase date hints it may have been intended as a Christmas present.

“I can remember the game. My neighbor down the street had it. I remember it being hard, and I was never that good of a gamer guy,” he said. “All the family has been trying to come up with a hypothesis … (My mom) thinks she put it there and never got it back out, and then it ended up in the attic.”

The game, based loosely on Greek mythology, follows a cupid-like protagonist named Pit attempting to rescue Palutena, the goddess of light, who is imprisoned by the evil Medusa.

“Get ready for the action and adventure of Greek Mythology translated to the Video Age,” the game’s packaging says. “Will you survive to restore Palutena’s light and return it to ‘Angel Land’? Only you know.”

The online auction closes Thursday.

If the sale goes as expected, it could net Amos and his family $10,000. They’re planning to have some fun with it.

“I have an older sister, too. We’re splitting (the proceeds) 50-50,” Amos said. “We’re going to do a Disney World vacation next month.”

Categories: News | World
TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.