Videos of fatal Connecticut police shooting of 18-year-old are released | TribLIVE.com
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Videos of fatal Connecticut police shooting of 18-year-old are released

Associated Press
1109932_web1_1109932-52948b4ba65d49afb9586e113c47543e
Hartford State’s Attorney via AP
This sequential combination of images from police dash camera video released Friday, May 3, 2019, by the Hartford State’s Attorney shows, from top left, Police Officer Layau Eulizier pointing his weapon at a car being driven at him by Anthony Jose Vega Cruz during an attempted traffic stop on April 20 in Wethersfield, Conn. Eulizier shot through the windshield, striking Vega Cruz, of Wethersfield, who died two days later at a hospital.
1109932_web1_1109932-9ed405c8ab8441b4ad3f4704931be998
Hartford State’s Attorney via AP
This still image from police dash camera video released Friday, May 3, 2019, by the Hartford State’s Attorney shows Police Officer Layau Eulizier pointing his weapon at a car being driven at him by Anthony Jose Vega Cruz during an attempted traffic stop April 20 in Wethersfield, Conn. Eulizier shot through the windshield, striking Vega Cruz, of Wethersfield, who died two days later at a hospital.
1109932_web1_1109932-2498bd66eddc4ccd961657e5066c71a8
Hartford State’s Attorney via AP
This still image from police dash camera video released Friday, May 3, 2019, by the Hartford State’s Attorney shows Police Officer Layau Eulizier, Jr., pointing his weapon at a car being driven at him by Anthony Jose Vega Cruz during an attempted traffic stop April 20 in Wethersfield, Conn. Eulizier shot through the windshield, striking Vega Cruz, of Wethersfield, who died two days later at a hospital.
1109932_web1_1109932-e165352639fc474a80afa039117046ff
Hartford State’s Attorney via AP
This still image from police dash camera video released Friday, May 3, 2019, by the Hartford State’s Attorney shows Police Officer Layau Eulizier pointing his weapon at a car being driven at him by Anthony Jose Vega Cruz during an attempted traffic stop April 20 in Wethersfield, Conn. Eulizier shot through the windshield, striking Vega Cruz, of Wethersfield, who died two days later at a hospital.
1109932_web1_1109932-e144b106628844bc9a4d78c6f9a0104b
Hartford State’s Attorney via AP
This still image from police dash camera video released Friday, May 3, 2019, by the Hartford State’s Attorney shows Police Officer Layau Eulizier pointing his weapon at a car being driven at him by Anthony Jose Vega Cruz during an attempted traffic stop April 20 in Wethersfield, Conn. Eulizier shot through the windshield, striking Vega Cruz, of Wethersfield, who died two days later at a hospital.

HARTFORD, Conn. — Videos released Friday show a Connecticut police officer’s fatal shooting last month of an 18-year-old man during an attempted traffic stop and chase, which sparked protests by the teen’s relatives and activists.

Wethersfield officer Layau Eulizier is seen on police dashcam and business surveillance videos running in front of a car while it is stopped briefly during the April 20 chase on a busy four-lane road. Eulizier yells, “Show me your hands” several times and fires two shots through the front windshield when the teenager drives at him.

The driver, Anthony Jose Vega Cruz , died two days later at a hospital, while a passenger, his 18-year-old girlfriend, was not injured.

Eulizier and another officer, who did not fire his gun, were trying to pull over Vega Cruz, whose nickname was Chulo, because the license plates on the car were not registered to that vehicle, officials said.

Lawyers for Vega Cruz’s family, Ben Crump and Michael Jefferson, said the videos show Eulizier “acted recklessly” when he shot at the unarmed couple.

“We are devastated, enraged, and continue to demand justice for their son and brother,” the lawyers said in a statement. “The video tells the story, and now, the officer must pay for his actions. We urge the State’s Attorney to bring swift justice for this hurting family and criminally charge the officer who killed Chulo.”

Eulizier was placed on paid leave pending the investigation, under normal police protocols.

Dashcam video shows the second officer, Peter Salvatore, pull Vega Cruz over shortly before the shooting. Vega Cruz and his girlfriend cannot be seen through the tinted driver and passenger windows. As Salvatore approaches the car on foot, Vega Cruz drives off.

About 10 seconds later, Vega Cruz loses control of his car when Eulizier, driving from the opposite direction, tries to stop him. The car slides across the road and skids 180 degrees to a stop, and Eulizier rams it head-on with his SUV cruiser. Vega Cruz then puts the car in reverse as Eulizier gets out of his cruiser and yells, “Show me your hands.” As Vega Cruz backs into the street, Salvatore rams the car, and it comes to a stop.

Eulizier then runs in front of the car, still yelling, “Show me your hands,” before opening fire as the car comes at him. The car stops briefly in the middle of the street, and then continues across the road and over a curb before hitting a sign and stopping. The woman in the car gets out with her hands up.

Hartford State’s Attorney Gail Hardy and Wethersfield officials said they released the videos in the interest of transparency while Hardy investigates and determines whether the shooting was justified. Hardy said she did not know how long the investigation will take.

Parts of the videos were edited “out of respect for Mr. Vega Cruz and his family, but the material being released does capture the portions of the incident pertinent to the investigation into the use of deadly force,” Hardy said.

There is no audio on the recording made by Salvatore’s dashcam, and the first minute of Eulizier’s 1½ minute dashcam video is silent. Wethersfield Police Chief James Cetran said there appeared to be synching issues with the microphones. He declined to comment on the shooting and the contents of the videos.

It was the second time in two weeks that Connecticut officials have taken the unusual step of releasing video of a police shooting so soon. They traditionally have waited until after an investigation is completed, as law enforcement officials in many other states do.

Last week, officials released police body camera and surveillance video of two police officers opening fire on an unarmed couple in a car in New Haven on April 16, while responding to a reported attempted armed robbery. A 22-year-old woman was wounded but survived.

Both police shootings sparked several days of protests by families, clerics, Black Lives Matter activists and others. All three officers involved in the two shootings are black.

Eulizier also was involved in a fatal 2015 shooting by police that was ruled justified.

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