World’s first 360-degree rooftop infinity pool to open atop London skyscraper | TribLIVE.com
U.S./World

World’s first 360-degree rooftop infinity pool to open atop London skyscraper

Chris Pastrick
1263720_web1_ptr-LondonPoolA-060819
Compass Pools
A UK-based pool manufacturer, Compass Pools, has announced plans to build a 360-degree infinity pool atop a 55-story skyscraper in London. It would be the world’s first such pool.

Now you can cheat death … and feel quite refreshed doing it.

A UK-based pool manufacturer, Compass Pools, has announced plans to build a 360-degree infinity pool atop a 55-story skyscraper in London. It would be the world’s first such pool.

The company says the 58,500-gallon pool would be made from “cast acrylic rather than glass, as this material transmits light at a similar wavelength to water so that the pool will look perfectly clear.”

“When we designed the pool, we wanted an uninterrupted view, both above and below the water,” says Compass Pool’s designer and technical director Alex Kemsley. “It really will be something else — but it’s definitely not one for the acrophobic.”

The bottom of the pool will also be transparent, letting hotel guests and visitors to check in on the swimmers above. (So no funny stuff, couples.)

ptr-London-Pool-C-060819
Compass Pools

Looking at the pool, you might wonder: How am I supposed to get in and out? Good question. Swimmers will access the pool through a rotating spiral staircase, which comes up from the pool floor.

“Normally a simple ladder would suffice, but we didn’t want stairs on the outside of the building or in the pool as it would spoil the view — and obviously you don’t want 600,000 liters of water draining through the building either,” Kemsley says.

“The solution is based on the door of a submarine, coupled with a rotating spiral staircase which rises from the pool floor when someone wants to get in or out — the absolute cutting edge of swimming pool and building design and a little bit James Bond to boot!”

To monitor the wind speed (you’re gonna need that so high up), the pool will have a built-in anemometer, which is linked to a computer-controlled system to maintain temperatures and ensure water doesn’t get blown to the streets below.

ptr-London-Pool-D-060819
Compass Pools

The pool will be heated with waste energy from the building’s air conditioning system — using a heat exchanger.

There also will be lights — for night swimmers — built into the bottom of the pool that change colors.

As for the building itself, called Infinity London, it will be 650 feet tall — about two times as tall as Big Ben — and feature a five-star hotel in the rooms just below the pool.

ptr-London-Pool-B-060819
Compass Pools

“Architects often come to us to design roof top infinity pools, but rarely do we get a say in the building design because the pool is usually an afterthought,” Kemsley says. “But on this project, we actually started with the pool design and essentially said, ‘How do we put a building underneath this?’”

Construction is set to begin in 2020, once they get all the contractors and partners lined up.

An exact location for the building has yet to be determined.

Chris Pastrick is a Tribune-Review digital producer. You can contact Chris at 412-320-7898, [email protected] or via Twitter .

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.