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Editorials

U.N. Watch: 'Rights' travesty

| Sunday, March 27, 2016, 9:00 p.m.

There wasn't much horn-blowing this month to mark the 10th anniversary of the United Nations' Human Rights Council. And how pathetic, too, that this club of the world's worst rights abusers apparently recognizes that it has little to celebrate.

The council replaced the former discredited U.N. Human Rights Commission, which in equal measures of ignorance and arrogance had reached the point of absurdity. A new 47-member council — but with many of the same players — was hailed as “a new beginning for the promotion and protection of human rights.”

Today's members — including Cuba, Venezuela, Russia and China — don't exactly rise to that challenge. But they'll aggressively defend their own abysmal records while focusing inordinate attention on the primary target of their disdain: Israel.

Just days before the council's anniversary, its record of inaction was detailed by Hillel Neuer, executive director of the monitoring group United Nations Watch. Issues long ignored, Mr. Neuer said, include the arbitrary arrests of dissidents in Venezuela and Cuba; the rape and enslavement of women in Syria and Iraq; state-sanctioned limits on the movements, education and employment of women in Iran; and the repression of speech in Saudi Arabia. Needless to say, the council's human rights reprobates were not amused by Mr. Neuer's assessments.

At least the United States no longer is a party to this human rights farce — nor should it ever be so again.

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