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Justice for Taryn & Tanner

| Sunday, June 1, 2014, 9:00 p.m.

Behold Canada and America. One country supports the efforts of a U.S. soldier's widow to hold accountable the jihadist who killed her husband, the father of her two young children. The other country helped free that jihadist from Guantanamo Bay in a shady deal that appeased his far-left allies.

Guess which side President Obama's on.

The widow is Tabitha Speer. Her children are Taryn and Tanner. Her husband and their father was an American hero: Sgt. 1st Class Christopher Speer, 28, a medic with the U.S. Special Forces. Speer died in Afghanistan during an ambush by al-Qaida operatives. The remorseless Islamic zealot who lobbed the fatal grenade that killed Speer in 2002: Omar Khadr, 15.

Bleeding-heart activists painted Khadr as a brainwashed “child” soldier while ignoring Speer's young daughter and son left fatherless in the name of Allah. Khadr knew exactly what he was doing: targeting Americans for murder. Sgt. Layne Morris of South Jordan, Utah, was there. He lost his right eye in the ambush and said after the attack: “That was a trained al-Qaida who wanted to make his last act on Earth the killing of an American.”

The FBI called Khadr, who was detained at Gitmo in November 2002, “cold and callous.” Terrorist videos showed the teen smiling as he rigged explosives in preparation for the fight. The thought of killing our soldiers brightened his day, he said. One of his leaders exulted on tape as they readied their bombs and grenades: “Allah willing, we will get a good number of Americans.”

As politicians on Memorial Day paid lip service to honoring those who have served and sacrificed, Tabitha Speer and Morris were doing what they could to uphold honor and fight for real justice for the fallen. They filed a civil suit against Canadian-born Khadr, who had pleaded guilty in 2010 to five war crimes, including murder and attempted murder, related to the ambush in Afghanistan.

Mrs. Speer and Morris successfully sued the estate of Khadr's jihadi father, al-Qaida financier Ahmed Said Khadr. But the terrorist patriarch died in a gun battle near the Pakistan-Afghanistan border in 2003, so a jury's $100 million civil award to Khadr's victims has never been collected.

But it did send a message. When necessary, American civilians will do the job their leaders won't do: pursue jihadist murderers whenever and wherever they can, and keep the legacies of our heroes in uniform alive. The latest lawsuit comes as Omar Khadr, now 27, prepares to sue the Canadian government for $20 million in civil rights damages.

The Canadian government lent its public support to the Speer family and to Morris on the eve of Memorial Day weekend. “Our government supports the efforts of Tabitha Speer and fellow soldiers to receive compensation for their horrible loss.” Good for them.

How about America's leaders? AWOL. The reason Khadr is in Canada is because Obama freed him from Gitmo after intense lobbying from the “compassionate” social justice crowd. He was repatriated to Canada just weeks before America's November 2012 election.

What does it say when the Canadian government shows more compassion for the fatherless children of a U.S. soldier than their own government?

Michelle Malkin is the author of “Culture of Corruption: Obama and his Team of Tax Cheats, Crooks and Cronies” (Regnery 2009).

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