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Quo vadis, America?

| Tuesday, June 30, 2015, 9:00 p.m.

“Natural law — God's law — will always trump common law,” said Alveda King, niece of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and a Christian leader in her own right. “God will have the final word in this matter.”

But, for now, Justice Anthony Kennedy has the final word.

Same-sex marriage is the law of the land, as the right of gays and lesbians to marry is right there in the 14th Amendment to the Constitution, which was ratified in 1868. We just didn't see it. Kennedy spotted what no previous court had detected.

The decision represents another stride forward for the revolution preached by Antonio Gramsci. Before we can capture the West, the Italian Marxist argued, we must capture the culture. For only if we change the culture can we change how people think and believe.

And then a new generation will not only come to accept but to embrace what their fathers would have resisted to the death. Consider the triumphs of the Gramscian revolution in our lifetime.

First, there is the purge of the nation's birth faith, Christianity, from America's public life and educational institutions. Second, there is the overthrow of the old moral order with the legalization, acceptance and even celebration of what the old morality taught was socially destructive and morally decadent.

How dramatic have the changes been?

Until the early 1970s, the American Psychiatric Association regarded homosexuality as a mental disorder. Until this century, homosexual actions were regarded as perverted and even criminal.

Similarly with abortion. It, too, was seen as shameful, sinful and criminal until Harry Blackmun and six other justices decided in 1973 that a right to an abortion was hiding there in the Ninth Amendment.

Did the Constitution change? No, we did, as Gramsci predicted.

We are told that America has “evolved” on issues like abortion and homosexuality. But while thinking may change, beliefs may change, laws may change and the polls have surely changed, does moral truth change?

If what Justice Kennedy wrote Friday represents moral truth, what can be said in defense of a Christianity that has taught for 2,000 years that homosexual acts are socially destructive and morally decadent?

“No-fault” divorce was an early social reform championed by our elites, followed by a celebration of the sexual revolution, the distribution of condoms to the poor and the young, and abortions subsidized by Planned Parenthood. How has that worked out for America?

Anyone see a connection between these milestones of social progress and the 40 percent illegitimacy rate nationwide, or the 50 percent rate among Hispanic Americans or the 72 percent rate among blacks?

One notes a headline the other day that among whites in America, deaths now outnumber births. Any connection between the legalization of abortions — 55 million in the USA since Roe — and the shrinkage of a population?

Our utopian president may see ours as an ever “more perfect union.” Yet, America has never been more disunited and divided — on politics and policy, religion and morality. We no longer even agree on good and evil, right and wrong.

Are we really still “one nation under God, indivisible”?

Pat Buchanan is the author of “The Greatest Comeback: How Richard Nixon Rose From Defeat to Create the New Majority.”

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