ShareThis Page
Laurels & lances: Girl Scouts, girl power and secret votes | TribLIVE.com
Editorials

Laurels & lances: Girl Scouts, girl power and secret votes

Tribune-Review
| Thursday, January 10, 2019 3:30 a.m
621041_web1_gtr-LIV-gscookies-011117-01
Tribune-Review file
Girl Scouts get pumped up before planning upcoming cookie sales at First Presbyterian Church in Greensburg.

Laurel: To the sweetest philanthropy. It’s cookie sale time, and the Girl Scouts are out in earnest, selling those Thin Mints, Trefoils, Do-Si-Dos and more at $5 a box.

Funds raised help subsidize camp registration costs, pay for community service projects and troop activities, and assist girls and troops with financial need.

Watching your cookie intake after a sweets- laden holiday season? Make a donation to a troop, or purchase a box for those serving in the military through the Girl Scouts’ Operation: Sweet Appreciation program.

Laurel: To state Sen. Kim Ward, R-Hempfield, for her recent appointment to the GOP Senate leadership. Although the Senate remains predominantly a boys club, Ward’s appointment points to her growing status as she returns to Harrisburg midway through her third term.

Lance: To the Westmoreland County judges, and particularly President Judge Rita Hathaway, for not announcing a vote total when the judges appoint a member of a school board, borough council, township commissioners or supervisors.

The judges don’t give voters a clue on whether some of the judges believe more than one candidate is qualified to hold an office, other than the one the president judge says has been appointed by the panel of judges. That means voters in the Norwin School District do not know if any of the judges believed that any of the 11 candidates, other than William Essay, was worth a vote.

There is no reason not to make that information public. Judges publish their opinions in other matters, and they poll juries in their courtrooms to make the way people voted in trials for murder or corruption openly known.

Their opinion, if revealed, might give some voters a reason to consider a particular candidate. It is best for all involved if the veil of secrecy is removed from how the candidates fared in the vote by the judges.



Categories: Opinion | Editorials
TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.