ShareThis Page
News

Who's writing 2016 success?

| Saturday, Dec. 15, 2012, 9:31 p.m.
FILE - In this Friday, July 27, 2012 file photo, Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal speaks at a Republican Party of Arkansas fundraising dinner in Hot Springs, Ark. Top officials in Jindal's administration used personal email accounts to craft a media strategy for cutting Medicaid — a method of communication that can make it more difficult to track under public records laws. Jindal, now in his second term, has become a leading voice among Republican governors and is considered a potential presidential candidate. His administration's emails fold into a national debate over the use of personal email accounts by government members to discuss official business. (AP Photo/Danny Johnston, File)
FILE - In this Friday, July 27, 2012 file photo, Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal speaks at a Republican Party of Arkansas fundraising dinner in Hot Springs, Ark. Top officials in Jindal's administration used personal email accounts to craft a media strategy for cutting Medicaid — a method of communication that can make it more difficult to track under public records laws. Jindal, now in his second term, has become a leading voice among Republican governors and is considered a potential presidential candidate. His administration's emails fold into a national debate over the use of personal email accounts by government members to discuss official business. (AP Photo/Danny Johnston, File)
New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie answers a question during a news conference in Trenton, N.J., Friday, Dec. 7, 2012, where he announced that New Jersey will become the first East Coast state to address the shortage of science and math teachers. The state will participate in the Princeton-based Woodrow Wilson Teaching Fellowship program, which offers $30,000 stipends for graduate school in exchange for three-year commitments to teach in high-need urban or rural schools. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie answers a question during a news conference in Trenton, N.J., Friday, Dec. 7, 2012, where he announced that New Jersey will become the first East Coast state to address the shortage of science and math teachers. The state will participate in the Princeton-based Woodrow Wilson Teaching Fellowship program, which offers $30,000 stipends for graduate school in exchange for three-year commitments to teach in high-need urban or rural schools. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
FILE - In this Aug. 23, 2011 file photo, Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., speaks at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library in Simi Valley, Calif.  New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez, Nevada Gov. Brian Sandoval and Rubio are popular, political newcomers who toe a safe party line in presidential battleground states. The rising GOP stars are also Hispanics, a fact the Republican Party clearly hopes to capitalize on in the upcoming national elections.  (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)
FILE - In this Aug. 23, 2011 file photo, Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., speaks at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library in Simi Valley, Calif. New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez, Nevada Gov. Brian Sandoval and Rubio are popular, political newcomers who toe a safe party line in presidential battleground states. The rising GOP stars are also Hispanics, a fact the Republican Party clearly hopes to capitalize on in the upcoming national elections. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)
Nikki Haley
Nikki Haley
Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush gestures while speaking at a news conference, Thursday, Dec. 6, 2012, in Philadelphia, where it was  announced he will follow Bill Clinton as chairman of the National Constitution Center. (AP Photo/ Joseph Kaczmarek)
Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush gestures while speaking at a news conference, Thursday, Dec. 6, 2012, in Philadelphia, where it was announced he will follow Bill Clinton as chairman of the National Constitution Center. (AP Photo/ Joseph Kaczmarek)
WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 01:  Ohio Governor-elect John Kasich talks with reporters after meeting with House and Senate Republican leaders and fellow governors-elect at the U.S. Capitol December 1, 2010 in Washington, DC.  The GOP leaders talked about ways to create jobs, cut spending and ways to repeal the health care law.  (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 01: Ohio Governor-elect John Kasich talks with reporters after meeting with House and Senate Republican leaders and fellow governors-elect at the U.S. Capitol December 1, 2010 in Washington, DC. The GOP leaders talked about ways to create jobs, cut spending and ways to repeal the health care law. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
no caption needed/aw
no caption needed/aw

Do bookshelves hold clues to the 2016 presidential race? Christian Heinze of the Congress-focused newspaper The Hill thinks so.

“Every GOP primary contender in 2012 except for Jon Huntsman could count him- or herself an author before launching a White House bid,” Heinze wrote recently for The Hill's Ballot Box blog. “So let's take a look at which 2016 possibilities have checked that box and who needs to spend some time by lamplight with quill and political pen.”

His “2016 possibilities” are all Republicans — perhaps because Heinze covered this year's GOP nomination race. Here's a summary of his takes on them:

• Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal, author of 2010's “Leadershlp and Crisis” (Regnery), “has plenty of material” for another book, which “could elaborate on” the conservatism overhaul he has urged “and would be read closely as a blueprint for his presidential message.”

• New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie “is currently bookless” and up for re-election next year, “so don't expect a book until after he takes his second oath of office.” Of particular interest would be how he'd handle his post-Sandy embrace of President Obama just before this year's election.

• U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio's autobiographical “An American Son: A Memoir” (Sentinel), released this year, has a “riveting personal story, honest reflection and politics that's free from bullet points.” Now that the Floridian has “checked the biography box, one can see him moving on to a deeper, more philosophical tome.”

• South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley's memoir “Can't Is Not an Option: My American Story” (Sentinel) arrived in April, just after Romney had sewn up the nomination. But “thanks to mediocre popularity at home, she was never really considered a vice presidential contender, and consequently, her book was largely overlooked.”

• Jeb Bush, former Florida governor, is co-writing a 2013 Threshold Editions release, “Immigration Wars: Forging an American Solution.” A 2016 Bush run “is likely to stand on two major pillars: education reform and immigration reform. Bush's upcoming book could form his opening argument.”

• Ohio Gov. John Kasich's latest of three books, 2010's “Every Other Monday: Twenty Years of Life, Lunch, Faith and Friendship” (Atria Books), “could pique the interest of Iowa's powerful evangelical population, which drives the Iowa caucuses.”

Heinze also mentions “bookless” GOP governors Susana Martinez (New Mexico), Bob McDonnell (Virginia) and Scott Walker (Wisconsin). Conspicious by his absence — perhaps an omen in itself — is published author Rick Santorum.

Also unmentioned by Heinze is that all 2016 contenders, Republican or Democrat, will have to sell an awful lot of their books to match the commercial success of the author they'll seek to replace in the Oval Office — Barack Obama.

Alan Wallace is a Trib Total Media editorial page writer (412-320-7983 or awallace@tribweb.com).

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me