ShareThis Page
Political Headlines

Republican presidential candidate Trump rejects charges of anti-Semitism

| Monday, July 4, 2016, 9:00 p.m.
A tweet Saturday with a six-sided star was deleted from GOP presidential hopeful Donald Trump’s Twitter account to be replaced shortly thereafter with the same image with a circle where the star had been.
Twitter
A tweet Saturday with a six-sided star was deleted from GOP presidential hopeful Donald Trump’s Twitter account to be replaced shortly thereafter with the same image with a circle where the star had been.

WASHINGTON — Donald Trump says Hillary Clinton's campaign is “ridiculous” to portray an anti-Clinton tweet that appeared to depict the Star of David atop a pile of cash as anti-Semitic.

In a statement issued by his Republican presidential campaign Monday evening, Trump suggested Clinton and her allies were using the matter to distract from her recent campaign troubles.

Trump said the tweet portrayed “a basic star, often used by sheriffs who deal with criminals and criminal behavior,” as part of an effort to convey that “Crooked Hillary is the most corrupt candidate ever.”

It was the presumptive GOP nominee's most extensive comment since his official account tweeted — then deleted — the image Saturday, sparking uproar over its potentially anti-Semitic connotations. Trump's account later posted a new version with a circle in place of the six-point star.

It remains unclear where the campaign found the image, but it previously appeared on a white supremacist message board filled with anti-Semitic messages as well as the Twitter feed of a self-identified comedian who tweeted provocative and offensive images.

Trump's campaign has not responded to questions since Saturday about who posted the message and where it was found.

Jonathan Greenblatt, CEO of the Anti-Defamation League, said Trump's attempt to dismiss the concerns of people who have taken issue with the post “falls somewhere between absurd and offensive.”

“It's not a left-wing issue or a right-wing issue,” he said. “It's not a Democratic issue or a Republican issue. It's a matter of common sense.” Greenblatt said: “It would be appropriate and timely for the presumptive GOP nominee for the White House to say unequivocally, I want nothing to do with these ideas,” and to say “hate has no place in making America great again.”

Earlier Monday, Sarah Bard, director of Jewish outreach for Clinton's Democratic presidential campaign, said in a statement that “Trump's use of a blatantly anti-Semitic image from racist websites to promote his campaign” was part of a pattern by him. “Now, not only won't he apologize for it, he's peddling lies and blaming others,” she added. “Trump should be condemning hate, not offering more campaign behavior and rhetoric that engages extremists.”

In his statement, Trump accused Clinton's campaign of using the tweet to try to “divert attention from the dishonest behavior of herself and her husband.” He cited her “missing emails” and Bill Clinton's impromptu meeting with Attorney General Loretta Lynch as her agency oversees the investigation into Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server as secretary of State.

Trump has long professed his support for Israel and his daughter converted to Judaism before her marriage. But he has come under scrutiny for repeatedly re-tweeting posts from white supremacists' accounts and for not immediately renouncing the support of former Ku Klux Klan Grand Wizard David Duke.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me