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VP candidate Tim Kaine speaks at Carnegie Mellon University

| Thursday, Oct. 6, 2016, 10:24 a.m.
Yasmine Kotturi, 24, of Shadyside and Ph.D. Computer Science student at Carnegie Mellon University uses a campaign sign for shade while waiting for Democratic Vice-Presidential candidate Tim Kaine to speak in front of CMU's Margaret Morrison Carnegie Hall in Oakland, Thursday, Oct. 6, 2016.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Yasmine Kotturi, 24, of Shadyside and Ph.D. Computer Science student at Carnegie Mellon University uses a campaign sign for shade while waiting for Democratic Vice-Presidential candidate Tim Kaine to speak in front of CMU's Margaret Morrison Carnegie Hall in Oakland, Thursday, Oct. 6, 2016.
Stefan Muller, 26, of Shadyside, Hannah Ringler, 23, of Squirel Hill and  Anson Kahng 22, of Shadyside (l-r) recite the pledge of Allegiance before Democratic Vice-Presidential candidate Tim Kaine appeared in front of CMU's Margaret Morrison Carnegie Hall in Oakland, Thursday, Oct. 6, 2016.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Stefan Muller, 26, of Shadyside, Hannah Ringler, 23, of Squirel Hill and Anson Kahng 22, of Shadyside (l-r) recite the pledge of Allegiance before Democratic Vice-Presidential candidate Tim Kaine appeared in front of CMU's Margaret Morrison Carnegie Hall in Oakland, Thursday, Oct. 6, 2016.
Yasmine Kotturi, 24, of Shadyside and Ph.D. Computer Science student at Carnegie Mellon University listens to speakers while waiting for Democratic Vice-Presidential candidate Tim Kaine to speak in front of CMU's Margaret Morrison Carnegie Hall in Oakland, Thursday, Oct. 6, 2016.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Yasmine Kotturi, 24, of Shadyside and Ph.D. Computer Science student at Carnegie Mellon University listens to speakers while waiting for Democratic Vice-Presidential candidate Tim Kaine to speak in front of CMU's Margaret Morrison Carnegie Hall in Oakland, Thursday, Oct. 6, 2016.
Saki Virja 70, of Squirrel Hill, listens to speakers while waiting for Democratic Vice-Presidential candidate Tim Kaine to speak in front of CMU's Margaret Morrison Carnegie Hall in Oakland, Thursday, Oct. 6, 2016.
Andrew Russell | Tribune-Review
Saki Virja 70, of Squirrel Hill, listens to speakers while waiting for Democratic Vice-Presidential candidate Tim Kaine to speak in front of CMU's Margaret Morrison Carnegie Hall in Oakland, Thursday, Oct. 6, 2016.

Democratic vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine addressed a modest crowd of several hundred in from of Margaret Morrison Carnegie Hall at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh.

A massive flag and bunting served as backdrop as Hillary Clinton's running mate made his first Pennsylvania appearance since Tuesday's debate with Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, who is running with Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump.

Kaine acknowledged up-front Pennsylvania is a key state in November.

Kaine's presentation was somewhat rambling - alternating between standard policy issues and new talking points from the debates - but it seemed to keep the attention of the crowd.

Kaine spoke to the predominantly younger crowd about his party's plan for free college education for children in families that make under $250,000 a year, about reproductive and gay rights, and about Trump refusing to release his tax returns.

Those in the crowd were receptive to the message.

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