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Donald Trump speaks at rally in Johnstown

| Friday, Oct. 21, 2016, 3:06 p.m.
Donald J. Trump speaks to a crowd at the Cambria County War Memorial Arena while campaigning for president in Johnstown on October 21, 2016.
Sean Stipp | Tribune-Review
Donald J. Trump speaks to a crowd at the Cambria County War Memorial Arena while campaigning for president in Johnstown on October 21, 2016.
Sophie Lamia, 8, (left) and Anna Cannizzaro, 6, both of Johnstown, cheer during the opening speakers during a rally for presidential candidate Donald J. Trump on Friday, Oct. 21, 2016, at the Cambria County War Memorial Arena in Johnstown.
Sean Stipp | Tribune-Review
Sophie Lamia, 8, (left) and Anna Cannizzaro, 6, both of Johnstown, cheer during the opening speakers during a rally for presidential candidate Donald J. Trump on Friday, Oct. 21, 2016, at the Cambria County War Memorial Arena in Johnstown.
Friends Chris Mraz (left) and Kevin Klug, both of Johnstown, bow their heads in prayer prior t the start of a rally for presidential candidate Donald J. Trump on Friday, Oct. 21, 2016, at the Cambria County War Memorial Arena in Johnstown.
Sean Stipp | Tribune-Review
Friends Chris Mraz (left) and Kevin Klug, both of Johnstown, bow their heads in prayer prior t the start of a rally for presidential candidate Donald J. Trump on Friday, Oct. 21, 2016, at the Cambria County War Memorial Arena in Johnstown.
Presidential candidate Donald J. Trump speaks to a large crowd at the Cambria County War Memorial Arena in Johnstown on October 21, 2016.
Sean Stipp | Tribune-Review
Presidential candidate Donald J. Trump speaks to a large crowd at the Cambria County War Memorial Arena in Johnstown on October 21, 2016.
Supporters cheer for presidential candidate Donald J. Trump as he speaks to a large crowd on Friday, Oct. 21, 2016, at the Cambria County War Memorial Arena in Johnstown.
Sean Stipp | Tribune-Review
Supporters cheer for presidential candidate Donald J. Trump as he speaks to a large crowd on Friday, Oct. 21, 2016, at the Cambria County War Memorial Arena in Johnstown.
Presidential candidate Donald J. Trump speaks to a large crowd on Friday, Oct. 21, 2016, at the Cambria County War Memorial Arena in Johnstown.
Sean Stipp | Tribune-Review
Presidential candidate Donald J. Trump speaks to a large crowd on Friday, Oct. 21, 2016, at the Cambria County War Memorial Arena in Johnstown.
Supporters cheer for presidential candidate Donald J. Trump as he speaks to a large crowd on Friday, Oct. 21, 2016, at the Cambria County War Memorial Arena in Johnstown.
Sean Stipp | Tribune-Review
Supporters cheer for presidential candidate Donald J. Trump as he speaks to a large crowd on Friday, Oct. 21, 2016, at the Cambria County War Memorial Arena in Johnstown.
Presidential candidate Donald J. Trump is welcomed by the crowd on Friday, Oct. 21, 2016, at the Cambria County War Memorial Arena in Johnstown.
Sean Stipp | Tribune-Review
Presidential candidate Donald J. Trump is welcomed by the crowd on Friday, Oct. 21, 2016, at the Cambria County War Memorial Arena in Johnstown.
Supporters listen as presidential candidate Donald J. Trump speaks to a large crowd on Friday, Oct. 21, 2016, at the Cambria County War Memorial Arena in Johnstown.
Sean Stipp | Tribune-Review
Supporters listen as presidential candidate Donald J. Trump speaks to a large crowd on Friday, Oct. 21, 2016, at the Cambria County War Memorial Arena in Johnstown.
A supporter cheers as presidential candidate Donald J. Trump speaks to a large crowd on Friday, Oct. 21, 2016, at the Cambria County War Memorial Arena in Johnstown.
Sean Stipp | Tribune-Review
A supporter cheers as presidential candidate Donald J. Trump speaks to a large crowd on Friday, Oct. 21, 2016, at the Cambria County War Memorial Arena in Johnstown.

Donald Trump delivered a subdued version of his stump speech at the Cambria County War Memorial arena in Johnstown Friday afternoon.

While Trump got plenty of hearty roars - especially against the media - from the crowd of more than 5,000, his delivery lacked the spark that has electrified crowds elsewhere.

Trump interspersed more "policy" between the offerings of red meat this time, talking about the Philadelphia Navy Yard, the history of Pennsylvania steel production and congressional term limits.

Janice Caper and her daughter Olivia were at the front doors of the Cambria County War Memorial arena at 6:30 a.m. — first in line — to see Trump speak in their hometown.

They'd been to the recent Trump rally in Ambridge, where roughly 3,000 people had to watch on a big screen in the parking lot because the venue filled so quickly; Janice and Olivia got in to the Ambridge event, but only just, and they did not want there to be any doubt this time.

As a result, they stood alone in the rain, the blue ink on their homemade their signs running, for nearly two hours before the next Trump fans joined them.

That didn't dampen the Capers' enthusiasm.

"We're rallying the deplorables!" Janice exclaimed.

The rain subsided before noon, and the crowd began to swell, with a line quickly extending down Napoleon Street and over the bridge across Conemaugh River.

Compared to other Trump rallies, the Johnstown event was remarkably quiet.

There were no protesters anywhere to be seen.

It may have been the early rain, or perhaps the lateness in the campaign season, but few were buying Trump merchandise from the vendors across the street.

Daniel Richards brought his buttons and T-shirts from Springfield, Illinois.

He said sales this campaign season have been good and that Donald Trump "put the hat back on the American people."

But Trump isn't the best-seller in Richards' experience.

If the election were determined by how much campaign merchandise was sold, "Bernie Sanders would win by a landslide," said Richards. "Bernie's outsold everybody."

Richards said he still takes "Feel the Bern" T-shirts - without the "for president" bit - to Hillary Clinton campaign events at which Sanders is speaking.

And they still sell like hotcakes.

While Western Pennsylvania is generally a Trump stronghold, the Johnstown venue did not draw the standing-room only crowd he has elsewhere.

As Trump stumps among his base, the Clinton campaign reiterated their claim he "is temperamentally unfit and dangerously unqualified to serve as president."

Hillary for Pennsylvania State Director Corey Dukes said Trump's "unprecedented refusal to say he will accept the election's result and his rhetoric and actions that degrade and demean women have shown that he has built his divisive campaign on tearing our country apart."

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