ShareThis Page
Political Headlines

This isn't 'Survivor,' Obama says; Trump, Clinton fire away

| Thursday, Nov. 3, 2016, 10:54 p.m.

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Donald Trump warned Thursday that a cloud of investigation would follow Hillary Clinton into the White House, evoking the bitter impeachment battle of the 1990s in a closing campaign argument meant to bring wayward Republicans home. Clinton and her allies, led by President Obama, told voters to get serious about the dangers of Trump.

As polls show Trump closing in on Clinton in key battleground states, her campaign is rushing to shore up support in some long-standing Democratic strongholds. That includes the campaign's Michigan firewall, a remarkable situation for a candidate who looked to be cruising to an easy win just a week ago.

Clinton's shrunken lead has given Trump's campaign a glimmer of hope, one he's trying to broaden into a breakthrough before time runs out. That means zeroing in on questions of Clinton's trustworthiness and a new FBI review of an aide's emails.

The attack is aimed at appealing to moderate Republicans and independents who have been the holdouts of his campaign, turned off by his behavior but equally repelled by the possible return of the Clintons.

“Here we go again with the Clintons — you remember the impeachment and the problems.” Trump said Thursday at a rally in Jacksonville. “That's not what we need in our country, folks. We need someone who is ready to go to work.”

Clinton and allies, meanwhile, are seeking to keep the spotlight on Trump, charging that his disparaging comments about women and minorities, and his temperament make him unfit for office.

“He has spent this entire campaign offering a dog whistle to his most hateful supporters,” Clinton said, singling out Trump's endorsement from the official newspaper of the Ku Klux Klan and noting that he has retweeted messages from white supremacists.

“This has never happened to a nominee of a major party,” Clinton said.

“If Donald Trump were to win this election we would have a commander in chief who is completely out of his depth and whose ideas are incredibly dangerous,” she said at Pitt Community College outside of Greenville, N.C. Clinton was slated to campaign later Thursday with former primary opponent Sen. Bernie Sanders and pop star Pharrell Williams in Raleigh.

Trump's path to victory remains narrow. He must win Florida to win the White House, no easy feat. Still, his campaign has been buoyed by tightening polls there and in other key battlegrounds, as well as by signs that African-American turnout for Clinton may be lagging.

At a nighttime rally in battleground North Carolina, Trump delivered a defense-related speech at which he said he can't picture Clinton as commander in chief. And he saluted veterans, saying, they are “so much more brave than me. I'm brave in other ways. I'm financially brave, big deal!”

Clinton enlisted Obama's help urging those voters to the polls and lighting a fire under other Democrats, particularly young people, who share some of the wariness about Clinton. Speaking to students at Florida International University in Miami, Obama told voters now was the time to get serious about the choice.

“This isn't a joke. This isn't ‘Survivor.' This isn't ‘The Bachelorette,' ” he said, taunting the former reality-TV star. “This counts.”

Relishing one of his last turns on the campaign stage as president, Obama repeatedly returned to his new campaign catchphrase capturing his disbelief in the unpredictable race to replace him.

“C'mon, man,” he said, to cheers.

Obama has been trying to bait the Republican into veering off message — counting on Trump not to have the discipline or the ground game to capitalize on a late surge.

But the famously unconventional Trump has been hewing closer to convention, running some upbeat ads, bringing out his wife for a rare campaign appearance and even talking publicly about trying not to get distracted.

“We don't want to blow it on Nov. 8,” Trump said Thursday at the rally in Jacksonville, his fourth in Florida in two days.

Clinton's weekend schedule underscored the Democrats' fresh anxiety in the final stretch. She is due to campaign Friday in Detroit, where a large turnout of black voters has long been crucial to success, following up on a last-minute meeting by former President Bill Clinton with black ministers on Wednesday night.

Clinton and Obama, along with their spouses, will headline a final pre-election rally in Philadelphia next Monday evening.

Trump has had far fewer allies carrying his message. Sen. Ted Cruz, his GOP primary foe, did campaign with vice presidential candidate Mike Pence outside Des Moines, Iowa, on Thursday, but he never mentioned Trump by name in a 14-minute speech.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me