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Hefty bill expected to care for animals removed from Brookline home

| Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016, 9:27 p.m.
A caique sits on the shoulder of Stephanie Dumaine, Animal Rescue League's assistant to shelter services, inside the facility's volunteer and foster office Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016. Animal Rescue League workers were forced to get creative with the space they have at the facility after receiving many of the 150-plus animals—mostly birds—that were removed from a Brookline home Tuesday. Many of the birds are currently housed in cages in offices and hallways.
Kristina Serafini | Tribune-Review
A caique sits on the shoulder of Stephanie Dumaine, Animal Rescue League's assistant to shelter services, inside the facility's volunteer and foster office Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016. Animal Rescue League workers were forced to get creative with the space they have at the facility after receiving many of the 150-plus animals—mostly birds—that were removed from a Brookline home Tuesday. Many of the birds are currently housed in cages in offices and hallways.
A caique sits on the shoulder of Stephanie Dumaine, Animal Rescue League's assistant to shelter services, as Kristina Paris, manager of offsite adoptions, looks on inside the facility's volunteer and foster office Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016. Animal Rescue League workers were forced to get creative with the space they have at the facility after receiving many of the 150-plus animals—mostly birds—that were removed from a Brookline home Tuesday. Many of the birds are currently housed in cages in offices and hallways.
Kristina Serafini | Tribune-Review
A caique sits on the shoulder of Stephanie Dumaine, Animal Rescue League's assistant to shelter services, as Kristina Paris, manager of offsite adoptions, looks on inside the facility's volunteer and foster office Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016. Animal Rescue League workers were forced to get creative with the space they have at the facility after receiving many of the 150-plus animals—mostly birds—that were removed from a Brookline home Tuesday. Many of the birds are currently housed in cages in offices and hallways.
Kristina Paris, Animal Rescue League's manager of offsite adoptions, takes inventory Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016 of birds the facilty received after 150 birds and other animals were removed from a Brookline home Tuesday. Because of the large intake of animals, Animal Rescue League workers were forced to get creative with the space they have at the facility. Many birds are currently housed in cages in offices and hallways.
Kristina Serafini | Tribune-Review
Kristina Paris, Animal Rescue League's manager of offsite adoptions, takes inventory Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016 of birds the facilty received after 150 birds and other animals were removed from a Brookline home Tuesday. Because of the large intake of animals, Animal Rescue League workers were forced to get creative with the space they have at the facility. Many birds are currently housed in cages in offices and hallways.
Birds sits in stacked cages inside Animal Rescue League's volunteer and foster office Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016. Animal Rescue League workers were forced to get creative with the space they have at the facility after receiving many of the 150-plus animals—mostly birds—that were removed from a Brookline home Tuesday. Many of the birds are currently housed in cages in offices and hallways.
Kristina Serafini | Tribune-Review
Birds sits in stacked cages inside Animal Rescue League's volunteer and foster office Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016. Animal Rescue League workers were forced to get creative with the space they have at the facility after receiving many of the 150-plus animals—mostly birds—that were removed from a Brookline home Tuesday. Many of the birds are currently housed in cages in offices and hallways.
A bird sits in cage in a hallway inside the Animal Rescue League on Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016. Animal Rescue League workers were forced to get creative with the space they have at the facility after receiving many of the 150-plus animals—mostly birds—that were removed from a Brookline home Tuesday. Many of the birds are currently housed in cages in offices and hallways.
Kristina Serafini | Tribune-Review
A bird sits in cage in a hallway inside the Animal Rescue League on Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016. Animal Rescue League workers were forced to get creative with the space they have at the facility after receiving many of the 150-plus animals—mostly birds—that were removed from a Brookline home Tuesday. Many of the birds are currently housed in cages in offices and hallways.
Animal Rescue League CEO Dan Rossi holds out his finger for a caique perched on the hand of Stephanie Dumaine, assistant to shelter services, inside the facility's volunteer and foster office Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016. Animal Rescue League workers were forced to get creative with the space they have at the facility after receiving many of the 150-plus animals—mostly birds—that were removed from a Brookline home Tuesday. Many of the birds are currently housed in cages in offices and hallways.
Kristina Serafini | Tribune-Review
Animal Rescue League CEO Dan Rossi holds out his finger for a caique perched on the hand of Stephanie Dumaine, assistant to shelter services, inside the facility's volunteer and foster office Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016. Animal Rescue League workers were forced to get creative with the space they have at the facility after receiving many of the 150-plus animals—mostly birds—that were removed from a Brookline home Tuesday. Many of the birds are currently housed in cages in offices and hallways.

Barbara Yogmas told police she acquired nearly 200 animals through Craigslist from people who no longer wanted them.

Caring for them will cost the Animal Rescue League an estimated $20,000, an official said Wednesday, because Yogmas and her mother were evicted from their Brookline home, described in court documents as being “beyond deplorable.”

Allegheny County Sheriff's deputies on Tuesday found 150 birds, 14 ferrets, 10 cats, seven dogs, seven Guinea pigs, three lizards, two geckos, one turtle, one hamster and one bearded dragon while serving an eviction notice on the Bay Ridge Avenue dwelling. Dan Rossi, the animal shelter's CEO, said it was the most animals the shelter has taken in at one time.

Several birds are infected with mites and will be quarantined for a few weeks before they are put up for adoption. Other animals will be placed into foster homes in the next day or so, he said.

Veterinarians are examining the birds and other animals, and each medical test costs several hundred dollars, said Rossi.

“When you add that up, that's a significant number,” Rossi said.

The rescue league is seeking monetary donations to cover the animals' medical expenses. The pets are being housed at the rescue league's East End facility and the Western Pennsylvania Humane Society on the North Side. The Beaver County Humane Society has offered to house some of the birds, Rossi said.

Pittsburgh police arrested and charged Yogmas, 45, and her mother, Barbara Courey, 70, with animal cruelty, endangering the welfare of a child and related counts, court records show. Yogmas' 12-year-old autistic son was taken into protective custody, police said.

According to a criminal complaint, the inside of the house was “beyond deplorable” and the stench of animal waste and urine was “overwhelming.”

Deputies served the eviction notice because “the bank reclaimed the house,” the complaint stated.

Officers noticed that Yogmas' son was not wearing shoes and his legs were covered with bug bites. The house was full of junk and clutter. Police wrote in the complaint that they did not believe the boy had a bed to sleep in.

Court records do not list an attorney for Yogmas or Courey. Their preliminary hearing is scheduled for Nov. 9.

Tony Raap is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at 412-320-7827 or traap@tribweb.com.

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