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HS football position by position breakdown: Scouting the cornerbacks

Chris Harlan
| Monday, Aug. 20, 2018, 7:20 p.m.
Aliquippa’s MJ Devonshire Jr. (8) rushes downfield during their game against Quaker Valley in Leetsdale on Friday, Oct. 13, 2017.
Aliquippa’s MJ Devonshire Jr. (8) rushes downfield during their game against Quaker Valley in Leetsdale on Friday, Oct. 13, 2017.
Aliquippa’s MJ Devonshire Jr. (8) rushes downfield during their game against Quaker Valley in Leetsdale on Friday, Oct. 13, 2017.
Aliquippa’s MJ Devonshire Jr. (8) rushes downfield during their game against Quaker Valley in Leetsdale on Friday, Oct. 13, 2017.

Western Pennsylvania was always a hotbed for quarterbacks, but nowadays it’s the cradle of cornerbacks.

The high school that produced Ty Law, Darrelle Revis and a long list of others has another four-star cornerback in MJ Devonshire, a senior at Aliquippa. But he’s not the only defensive back that’s drawing national offers this year. North Allegheny’s Joey Porter Jr. received offers from as far away at Arizona State, LSU and Colorado State, his famous father’s alma mater.

Devonshire and Porter lead this list of talented cornerbacks with all five headed to Division I schools.

1. MJ Devonshire

Aliquippa, sr., 5-11, 170

Devonshire was a key part of a dominant defense last season that didn’t allow a touchdown until Week 7. He scored 13 times , including a 72-yard interception return and an 81-yard punt return. His list of scholarship offers includes Ohio State and Michigan State, along with Pitt, WVU and others. This past spring, he won WPIAL Class AA track titles in the 100 and 200 meters.

2. Joey Porter Jr.

North Allegheny, sr., 6-2, 180

Porter emerged as a defensive star in his first season at cornerback, intercepting seven passes , returning a fumble 75 yards for a touchdown and taking a punt to the end zone. He holds almost 30 scholarship offers with Pitt, Penn State, LSU, Miami and Nebraska announced as his finalists. His father is a former Steelers linebacker and current assistant coach.

3. Daequan Hardy

Penn Hills, sr., 5-10, 165

Hardy made eight interceptions last season, returning one for a touchdown. He also led the team in receptions with 37 for 783 yards. His list includes around a dozen college offers, including Michigan, Michigan State and Nebraska.

4. Mike Coleman

Woodland Hills, sr., 5-11, 165

Coleman committed to Toledo in April, choosing the Rockets over offers from more than a dozen other schools. He was a versatile and physical defender in Woodland Hills’ secondary. Buffalo, Central Michigan, Miami (Ohio) and Temple are among the others that wanted him.

5. Parrish Parker

West Mifflin, sr., 5-10, 180

Parker was a hard-hitting safety for West Mifflin last season, but this year coaches planned for him to play cornerback. He committed in August to Howard, an FCS school in Washington D.C. He also held FBS offers from Ball State, Buffalo and Toledo.

One to watch

Mason Ventrone

Mt. Lebanon, jr., 6-0, 180

Ventrone earned first-team all-conference honors as a sophomore in Class 6A last season. The cover corner was credited with 29 solo tackles . As a high jumper, he placed third in the state as a freshman with a leap of 6 feet, 4 inches.

Chris Harlan is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Chris at charlan@tribweb.com or via Twitter @CHarlan_Trib.

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