2-time Indy 500 winner Al Unser Jr. charged with driving while intoxicated | TribLIVE.com
U.S./World Sports

2-time Indy 500 winner Al Unser Jr. charged with driving while intoxicated

Associated Press
1182897_web1_AP_090416151745
AP
In this April 16, 2009 file photo Al Unser Jr., six-time winner of the Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach, speaks during a ceremony inducting him into the Long Beach Motorsports Walk of Fame, in Long Beach, Calif. Unser Jr. pleaded guilty Wednesday, April 11, 2012, to driving while intoxicated and racing on a New Mexico freeway. He faces another charge of driving while intoxicated early Monday, May 20, 2019.

AVON, Ind. — Retired two-time Indianapolis 500 winner Al Unser Jr. was arrested early Monday in central Indiana and charged with operating a vehicle while intoxicated.

Unser, 57, was stopped in Avon, just west of Indianapolis, the Indianapolis Star reported from police records.

He was jailed about 3:20 a.m. in Hendricks County on a charge of operating a vehicle while intoxicated. Unser’s attorney declined to comment Monday.

Unser is a consultant with the Harding Steinbrenner Racing team.

“The entire Harding Steinbrenner Racing organization is saddened to learn of Al Unser Jr’s arrest on an OWI charge,” the team tweeted Monday. “Alcoholism is a disease and a continuing battle for those struggling with it. At this time, we do support Al in any way that he needs.”

INDYCAR and Indianapolis Motor Speedway also released a statement, saying “Al Jr. is loved by the racing community. Everyone at INDYCAR and Indianapolis Motor Speedway is with him and his family and stand ready to provide the support he needs.”

Unser is the son of Indy 500 racing legend Al Unser and the nephew of three-time Indy winner Bobby Unser. Unser Jr. competed in the Indianapolis 500 19 times, winning the race in 1994 and 1992. He also won two CART points titles and two IROC championships.

He was arrested in New Mexico in 2011 on drunken and reckless driving charges. Authorities in Albuquerque said Unser was driving more than 100 mph while drag racing against the driver of another vehicle.

Unser pleaded no contest to a driving under the influence charge stemming from a January 2007 crash on a Nevada freeway. Nevada authorities said Unser’s blood-alcohol content was three times the legal limit and he failed field sobriety tests. As part of the plea deal, Unser lost his driver’s license for 90 days, was fined $1,000 and had to attend a drunken driving school, a victim-impact panel and undergo alcohol abuse evaluation.

Categories: Sports | US-World
TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.