5 names to remember in goal at the NHL Draft this weekend | TribLIVE.com
Penguins/NHL

5 names to remember in goal at the NHL Draft this weekend

Jonathan Bombulie
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Getty Images
Valentin Nussbaumer of Switzerland pulls a deke on goalie Pyotr Kochetkov of Russia at the 2019 IIHF World Junior Championships on Jan., 5, 2019 at Rogers Arena in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

With undrafted 20-year-old Alex D’Orio the only developmental goalie in the system, it’s entirely possible the Pittsburgh Penguins will use a draft choice at the position this weekend. Amateur scouting has been part of goalie development coach Andy Chiodo’s duties.

Here is a list of five names to remember at the goalie position in the draft:

• Spencer Knight, 6-3, 197, U.S. National Team Development Program: Likely the only goalie who will be picked in the first round. He’s a great stickhandler with a 32-4-1 record last season.

• Mads Sogard, 6-7, 192, Medicine Hat (WHL): Has some rough edges to smooth over, but NHL teams will be salivating over his size.


• Pyotr Kochetkov, 6-3, 205, Ryazan (Russia): Had a .953 save percentage at World Juniors and was named the tournament’s top goalie.

• Hunter Jones, 6-4, 202, Peterborough (OHL): Athletic goaltender who says he patterns his game after Matt Murray.

• Dustin Wolf, 5-11, 186, Everett (WHL): Coming off a brilliant junior season with a 41-15-2 record and .936 save percentage, but his height could scare teams away.

Jonathan Bombulie is a Tribune-Review assistant sports editor. You can contact Jonathan by email at [email protected] or via Twitter .

Categories: Sports | Penguins
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