ShareThis Page
American Sloane Stephens advances at Australian Open | TribLIVE.com
U.S./World Sports

American Sloane Stephens advances at Australian Open

The Associated Press
| Wednesday, January 16, 2019 12:40 a.m
643179_web1_643179-9cb987b4f89a449cba41f664070808cd

MELBOURNE, Australia — Sloane Stephens advanced at the Australian Open at the expense of her former doubles partner, Timea Babos, in a second-round match the women’s tour billed as a battle of the so-called “frenemies.”

Fifth-seeded Stephens, the 2017 U.S. Open champion, dominated the Rod Laver Arena opener 6-3, 6-1 on Wednesday, but Babos kept her working by saving 18 of the 23 break points she faced.

This is the first time since 2014 that Stephens has put back-to-back wins together at Melbourne Park. She reached the fourth round in 2014, a year after making a run to the semifinals.

She puts the improvement down to feeling more relaxed.

“Yeah, considering I haven’t won a match here in I don’t know how long,” she said. “I’m kind of conquering all the places where I’ve been terrible. So Asia, I’ve won a few matches there, and here.

“I know haven’t done well here the last few years …. (so) putting the emphasis on trying to start the year on a good foot.”

Stephens and Babos combined to win three junior Grand Slam doubles titles — the French, Wimbledon and U.S. Open — in 2010.

Stephens couldn’t remember exactly how the combination was formed in the juniors, but said she knew what to expect from Babos.

“She obviously is an incredible doubles player, last year No. 1 in the world,” she said. “I see her every week. We’re good.”

Stephens will next play No. 31-seeded Petra Martic, who beat Marketa Vondrousova 6-4, 7-5.

In other early women’s matches Wednesday, Ash Barty had seven aces and dropped serve only once in a 6-2, 6-3 win over Wang Yafan to continue her bid to end a title drought for Australian women at the championship that dates to 1978.

American teenager Amanda Anisimova advanced to the third round with a 6-0, 6-2 win over 24th-seeded Lesia Tsurenko. Tsurenko had only nine winners in the 54-minute match.

Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova eliminated ninth-seeded Kiki Bertens 3-6, 6-3, 6-3 to reach the third round of a major for the first time since her quarterfinal run here in 2017, and Aliaksandra Sasnovich beat 20th-seeded Anett Kontaveit 6-3, 6-3.

No. 19-seeded Caroline Garcia advanced 6-3, 6-3 over Zoe Hives.

Advancing on the men’s side were 2010 Wimbledon finalist Tomas Berdych, No. 14-seeded Stefanos Tsitsipas and No. 19 Nikoloz Basilashvili.

Stefanos Tsitsipas also is through to the third round and closer to a potential meeting with defending champion Roger Federer at Melbourne Park.

The Greek 20-year-old beat Viktor Troicki, 6-3, 2-6, 6-2, 7-5, but wasted a lot of break-point opportunities as the Serbian player saved 15 of 19 chances created by Tsitsipas.



Categories: Sports | US-World
TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.