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Antonio Brown not done being a nuisance in Pittsburgh | TribLIVE.com
Steelers/NFL

Antonio Brown not done being a nuisance in Pittsburgh

Matt Rosenberg
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Matt Rosenberg | Tribune-Review
Overgrown grass is seen on the property around the Pine home of former Steelers receiver Antonio Brown on Friday, May 24, 2019.
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Matt Rosenberg | Tribune-Review
Overgrown grass is seen on the property around the Pine home of former Steelers receiver Antonio Brown on Friday, May 24, 2019.
1205232_web1_IMG_2870
Matt Rosenberg | Tribune-Review
Overgrown grass is seen on the property around the Pine home of former Steelers receiver Antonio Brown on Friday, May 24, 2019.
1205232_web1_IMG_2868
Matt Rosenberg | Tribune-Review
Overgrown grass is seen on the property around the Pine home of former Steelers receiver Antonio Brown on Friday, May 24, 2019.

Antonio Brown might be gone from the Pittsburgh Steelers, but he’s not quite done causing a stir in the Pittsburgh area.

The grass on Brown’s Pine property appears to have gone weeks without manicuring, and a neighbor called him out on Twitter on Thursday night in a tweet that since has gone viral.

The Tribune-Review traveled to Brown’s home Friday morning, verifying the grass indeed was overgrown, as neighbor Donald Binotto’s tweet indicated.

Allegheny County real estate records confirm Brown is the owner of the home and Binotto is a neighbor.

No one answered the door at Brown’s home Friday.

Brown replied to Binotto on Thursday night, asking, “Can you be a Good Samaritan and do me a solid cut my grass that’s my other property up for sell in PA !”

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Grass on parts of the property was taller than 2 feet, and the shorter areas were still as tall as 1 foot.

Brown purchased the property in July 2014 for $1.91 million, according to county real estate records.

The Pine home is no stranger to attention. The Tribune-Review reported in November that Northern Regional Police were called to the home April 17, 2018, when Brown reported someone had stolen a safe from it. A police report showed Brown told police it contained more than $2 million worth of jewelry, passports, a 9mm handgun and $50,000.

In May 2018, a neighbor accused Brown and another person of illegally riding ATVs on their street and a private lawn, according to a police report.

Earlier this month, Brown was back in Pittsburgh to appeal the reckless driving charge from when he drove over 100 mph on McKnight Road.

The charge was reduced to a lesser charge of driving at unsafe speeds.

The Steelers in April traded Brown to the Oakland Raiders, who gave him a three-year, $50.125 million contract. Brown made his Raiders on-field debut this week on Day 2 of organized team activities.

Matt Rosenberg is a Tribune-Review assistant multimedia editor. You can contact Matt at 412-320-7937, [email protected] or via Twitter .

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