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Crashes don't slow Button in F1 Belgian Grand Prix

| Sunday, Sept. 2, 2012, 4:04 p.m.
Formula One driver Jenson Button of Britain celebrates after winning the Belgian F1 Grand Prix on Sept. 2, 2012.           REUTERS/Dimitar Dilkoff
REUTERS
Formula One driver Jenson Button of Britain celebrates after winning the Belgian F1 Grand Prix on Sept. 2, 2012. REUTERS/Dimitar Dilkoff

SPA, Belgium — Jenson Button coasted to his second victory of the season on Sunday at the Belgian Grand Prix after Formula One championship leader Fernando Alonso was sent flying off the track following Romain Grosjean's reckless driving.

It was Button's first victory at Spa and No. 14 for the British driver's career. He led from start to finish, oblivious to the mayhem behind him.

“This is such a special circuit, so to get a victory here from light to flag is very special,” Button said. “It hasn't been an easy year for me. We're going to enjoy this for a little while longer before we head to Monza and hopefully do the same.”

Button triumphantly zigzagged across the track as he approached the finish line and then clapped his hands together in celebration. He then stood on his McLaren and leaned his head back as he clenched both fists.

“The car felt very good to drive and I could control the degradation of the tires. It's always easier to do that when you're leading,” said Button, who climbed to sixth place overall. “It's a massive long shot to win the title, but today proves that you can claw back 25 points very quickly. There's still 63 points to make up, but anything's possible.”

Alonso, who is chasing his third F1 title, was relieved after he felt OK following the scary wreck.

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