Boxer Patrick Day dies from brain injuries 4 days after fight | TribLIVE.com
U.S./World Sports

Boxer Patrick Day dies from brain injuries 4 days after fight

Samson X Horne
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In this Oct. 27, 2018, file photo, Patrick Day, right, punches Elvin Ayala during the fifth round of a WBC super welterweight boxing bout in New York. Day won the fight. Day died Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2019, four days after sustaining head injuries in a fight with Charles Conwell. Promoter Lou DiBella said Day died at Northwestern Memorial Hospital. He was 27. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

Boxer Patrick Day has died from apparent brain injuries four days after a bout with Charles Conwell.

His death was announced by promoter Lou DiBella on Wednesday . Day was 27.

“He was surrounded by his family, close friends and members of his boxing team, including his mentor, friend and trainer Joe Higgins,” DiBella said in a statement on his website. “He was a son, brother, and good friend to many. Pat’s kindness, positivity and generosity of spirit made a lasting impression with everyone he met.”

Day had emergency brain surgery after being knocked out in the 10th round Saturday night at Wintrust Arena in Chicago, according to The Associated Press.

The junior middleweight was knocked down twice earlier in the fight and was taken from the ring on a stretcher, the AP reported.

According to Sports Illustrated, Day’s final time hitting the canvas was the result of a “barrage of punches.”

As of Sunday evening, DiBella Entertainment said Day was still in a coma and was in “extremely critical condition.”

On Monday, Conwell posted a heartfelt message to Day on social media.

“I never meant for this to happen to you. All I ever wanted to do was win. If I could take it all back I would. No one deserves for this to happen to them,” Conwell wrote. “I replay the fight over and over in my head thinking what if this never happened and why did it happen to you.”

DiBella Entertainment said Day’s passing makes it “very difficult to explain away or justify the dangers of boxing at a time like this.

“This is not a time where edicts or pronouncements are appropriate, or the answers are readily available. It is, however, a time for a call to action,” the statement said. “While we don’t have the answers, we certainly know many of the questions, have the means to answer them, and have the opportunity to respond responsibly and accordingly and make boxing safer for all who participated. This is a way we can honor the legacy of Pat Day. Many people live much longer than Patrick’s 27 years, wondering if they made a difference or positively affected their world. This was not the case for Patrick Day when he left us. Rest in peace and power, Pat, with the angels.”

A Freeport, N.Y. native, Day had a career record of 17-4-1 with six knockouts. As an amateur, he won two Nationals titles, the New York Golden Gloves tournament and was a U.S. Olympic team alternate in 2012, according to the AP.

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Samson X Horne is a Tribune-Review digital producer. You can contact Samson at 412-320-7845, [email protected] or via Twitter .

Categories: Sports | US-World
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