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Charlie McAvoy’s back for Bruins, and now comes easy part | TribLIVE.com
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Charlie McAvoy’s back for Bruins, and now comes easy part

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Boston Bruins defenseman Charlie McAvoy returns from a one-game suspension as the Boston Bruins host the Carolina Hurricanes on Sunday in Game 2 of the Eastern Conference final.

BOSTON — When he’s playing, Bruins defenseman Charlie McAvoy said, it’s easy for him to maintain his composure and concentrate on the game in front of him.

Up in the press box, that’s the hard part.

“I’m not a very good hockey watcher,” McAvoy said as he prepared to return from his one-game suspension for Game 2 of the Eastern Conference finals against the Carolina Hurricanes. “The game seems like it’s much longer.”

McAvoy was suspended for a shoulder to the head of Columbus forward Josh Anderson in the second-round finale. So instead of taking the ice in his usual pairing with Zdeno Chara, McAvoy was wandering around the media dining area before Game 1, wondering if he had to pay or not. (He didn’t.)

And while his teammates were beating the Hurricanes, 5-2, in the conference final opener, McAvoy was in street clothes on the top level of TD Garden, trying to keep his emotions under control.

“Here on this level, I’m like this,” McAvoy said, holding out his hand, palm down, and moving it in a steady and straight line in front of his face.

“But up there,” he said, pumping his fist and bouncing out of his imaginary seat. “I’m glad I get to play tomorrow.”

A 21-year-old first-round draft choice from Boston University, McAvoy had seven goals and 21 assists from the blue line this year, his second full season in the NHL. He missed six weeks early in the season with a concussion and another two over Christmas because of a foot injury.

But he hadn’t had to sit out healthy, for just one game.

McAvoy said he would try to use the forced break to his advantage.

“Whenever you’re out, you can use it as an opportunity to get other things feeling right,” he said, adding that watching the game from above gave him a perspective that would be beneficial. “I feel like I picked up on some things.”

Bruins coach Bruce Cassidy said McAvoy was missed for his physical play and his ability to start the transition to offense.

“Those up-the-middle passes that maybe the other guys just don’t have the vision or confidence, or both, to make,” he said. “Those quick-strike plays where forwards are getting the pucks in their hands in good spots with a better chance to attack.”

Steven Kampfer, who replaced McAvoy in the lineup, had Boston’s first goal, and the Bruins scored four times in the third period on Thursday night to take a 1-0 lead in the best-of-seven series. Game 2 is Sunday at TD Garden, with the series moving to Carolina for Games 3 and 4 on Tuesday and Thursday.

The Hurricanes fell behind 2-0 in their first-round series against the Washington Capitals before eliminating the defending Stanley Cup champions in seven games. In the second round, they swept the New York Islanders.

“We don’t want to get down 2-0,” Carolina coach Rod Brind’Amour said. “If we get to that point, that’s what everyone will be saying. We have some things to draw on, no matter what, no matter which way this thing goes.”

Categories: Sports | NHL
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