ShareThis Page
District Colleges

Hockenberry helps Syracuse rowing team reach Royal Regatta

| Thursday, July 12, 2018, 10:51 p.m.

North Hills graduate and Syracuse rower Josh Hockenberry had a ringside seat recently at one of the world’s most famous rowing events.

Hockenberry, a departing senior, was an alternate on an Orange men’s eight that competed at the Henley Royal Regatta in England.

Established in 1839, the regatta is held every year on the River Thames near the town of Henley-on-Thames. The regatta features 23 events.

Syracuse was one of nine U.S. crews in the Temple Challenge Cup men’s student event and 35 American crews overall.

The regatta is regarded a part of the English social season. Spectators dress in smart summer casual, with no jeans and shorts allowed.

Queen Elizabeth is the patron.

It was Syracuse’s first appearance since 2008.

Syracuse coach David Reischman said Hockenberry and another alternate practiced every day and were available if someone got sick or injured.

He said the squad’s five seniors were rewarded with the trip for their four years of leadership and hard work.

Crews raced two at a time, head-to-head, on a 2,112-meter (1 mile, 550 yard) course.

The Orange beat Cornell by one length in 6 minutes, 17 seconds and Trinity College, of Dublin, Ireland, by 2 1/2 lengths (6:24) before losing to Oxford Brookes, the defending champion, by one length in the third heat.

Reischman said it was ironic Syracuse and Cornell, both located in Upstate New York, faced each other so far away.

“We traveled over the Atlantic to race someone we could have raced by driving 50 miles south on (Interstate) 81,” he said.

Randy Hockenberry said his son, who is traveling in Europe, enjoyed his stay with his host family.

Karen Kadilak is a freelance writer.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me