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Duquesne

Duquesne falls at No. 24 Rhode Island on buzzer-beating 3

| Saturday, Jan. 27, 2018, 3:45 p.m.
Rhode Island's Jeff Dowtin drives against Duquesne's Kellon Taylor during first half Saturday, Jan 27, 2018, in Kingston, R.I.
Rhode Island's Jeff Dowtin drives against Duquesne's Kellon Taylor during first half Saturday, Jan 27, 2018, in Kingston, R.I.
Rhode Island's Jeff Dowtin (11) shoots over Duquesne's Kellon Taylor (20) during first half of an NCAA college basketball game Saturday, Jan 27, 2018, in Kingston, R.I. (AP Photo/Stew Milne)
Rhode Island's Jeff Dowtin (11) shoots over Duquesne's Kellon Taylor (20) during first half of an NCAA college basketball game Saturday, Jan 27, 2018, in Kingston, R.I. (AP Photo/Stew Milne)

KINGSTON, R.I. — Stanford Robinson plays pretty good defense. The fact is he can also hit the big shot.

He did just that Saturday, a 3-pointer at the buzzer to give No. 24 Rhode Island a 61-58 victory over Duquesne.

The Rams (17-3, 9-0) have won 12 in a row and 17 straight against Saturday in the Atlantic 10 Conference opponents.

Robinson was averaging 10 points a game. He felt it worked to his advantage that he was not viewed as threat by Duquesne (14-8, 5-4).

“I think people feel I'm a defensive player so they stop playing me,” he said. “But I practice that shot every day so I kind of knew a little bit (it was going in).”

A floater off the glass by Duquesne's Eric Williams Jr. made it 58-58 with 28.6 seconds left in regulation. After a timeout, Jeff Dowtin held the ball before he passed to Robinson in the left corner, and the senior nailed it.

“We had exhausted E.C. (Matthews) and Jared (Terrell) a little bit at that point,” Rhode Island coach Dan Hurley said. “I think today we were a little bit too much paint, touch and shoot throughout the game. We just didn't share the ball. We're going to look bad on offense when we don't do that. It seemed like whoever had it drove it and shot it.

“I just wanted to get the ball to our best decision maker, who's Jeff. I wanted him to make a good basketball play. He pitched it, and Stan had a clean shot and a clean look.”

Matthews paced Rhode Island with 20 points, and Jared Terrell added 12.

Rene Castro-Kennedy had 16, and Mike Lewis contributed 12 for Duquesne.

Duquesne coach Keith Dambrot pointed to his team's inability to handle the ball. The Rams, who played man-to-man all game, scored 15 points off 19 Duquesne turnovers.

“You can't make 19 turnovers,” Dambrot said. “If we make 10, we win.”

Duquesne began the second half on a 9-0 run which increased its lead to 38-23. Rhode Island then locked up on defense and tied it 45-45 on Matthews' layup. Matthews scored 11 of Rhode Island's last 16 points.

“They were rhythm shots,” Matthews said. “I was getting down there and they were going in. Once that started happening, I didn't want to stop.”

Hurley knows things will not get easier.

“We have a huge target on us,” he said. “You're playing every two or three days, and this is a grind conference. Some games you have to be able to will yourself through it. You have to win ugly sometimes.”

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