Could Pitt be favored in its final eight games? | TribLIVE.com
Pitt

Could Pitt be favored in its final eight games?

Jerry DiPaola
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Pitt’s Aaron Mathews leaps over UCF’s Antwan Collier in the first quarter Saturday, Sept. 21, 2019 at Heinz Field.

The lessons to be learned from college football are things aren’t always what they seem, favorites do lose (a lot) and trying to figure out what happens in Vegas is a foolish endeavor.

Nonetheless, there is an argument to be made that Pitt (2-2) could be favored in its final eight regular-season games.

A reach? Probably. But after Pitt Special and wide receiver Aaron Mathews turning into hurdler, shot blocker and quarterback – all in the same game — anything’s possible.

Delaware – The Blue Hens are ranked 20th in the FCS, but needed triple overtime to beat Rhode Island, nearly lost to Penn, 28-27, and did lose to Pitt, 62-0, in 2014.

At Duke – The Blue Devils couldn’t beat Pitt when Daniel Jones was their quarterback. Also, Pitt is 3-0 in Durham as an ACC team.

At Syracuse – The Orange are 2-2 – many expected more from them — and have allowed 137 points in three games (63 to Clemson, 41 to Maryland and 33 to Western Michigan). Realistically, Pitt could be an underdog in this game, but its past four games in the Carrier Dome (2-2) have been decided by a total of eight points.

Miami – The U escaped with a 17-12 victory against Central Michigan, which lost to Wisconsin, 61-0. Miami coach Manny Diaz, whose team was a 30-point favorite, said it was the ‘Canes’ worst effort of the season.

At Georgia Tech – RIP, the Ramblin’ Wreck’s triple option. They lost in overtime to The Citadel.

North Carolina – It looked like Mack Brown’s return to coaching was going well when the Tar Heels beat South Carolina and Miami. But they lost to Appalachian State, 34-31, on Saturday.

At Virginia Tech – The Hokies lost to Boston College, which lost to Kansas, 48-24, at home.

Boston College – Another game in which Pitt could be an underdog. But Kansas? Really?

Get the latest news about Pitt football and all things Panthers athletics.

Jerry DiPaola is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Jerry by email at [email protected] or via Twitter .

Categories: Sports | Pitt
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