Couple married during halftime of Bills-Patriots game | TribLIVE.com
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Couple married during halftime of Bills-Patriots game

Frank Carnevale
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AP
Mackenzie Park and Jordan Binggeli share a kiss after being married at midfield during halftime of an NFL football game between the Buffalo Bills and the New England Patriots, Sunday, Sept. 29, 2019, in Orchard Park, N.Y.
1740408_web1_1740408-ffe6c603a17449ee8374a11e154100f7
AP
Mackenzie Park and Jordan Binggeli cheer after being married at midfield during halftime of an NFL football game between the Buffalo Bills and the New England Patriots, Sunday, Sept. 29, 2019, in Orchard Park, N.Y.

Two Buffalo Bills super fans were married on the field during the halftime of the Bills – New England Patriots game.

After the Bills became the first team to put up points in the first half against the Patriots this season and went into the locker room trailing 13-3, the Bills rolled out a wedding on the 50-yard line.

Mackenzie Park and Jordan Binggelli won the team’s “Halftime Wedding of a Lifetime” contest and were wed on New Era Field.

The Bills brought out several stars for the occasion.

Hall of Famer Jim Kelly gave away the bride and Bills great Kyle Williams officiated the ceremony. Bills legend and Hall of Famer Bruce Smith was also at the event, as were over 71,000 fans.

Nearly 1,400 couples applied for the contest. But diehard fans Park and Binggelli seemed destined to celebrate their love for each other and their team: Their first date was at a Bills game in 2008.

The Bills posted lots of photos.

Frank Carnevale is a Tribune-Review digital producer. You can contact Frank via Twitter .

Categories: Sports | NFL
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