Dodgers shut down pitcher Clayton Kershaw | TribLIVE.com
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Dodgers shut down pitcher Clayton Kershaw

Associated Press
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AP
Dodgers pitcher Clayton Kershaw has been shut down indefinitely because manager Dave Roberts says the ace “didn’t feel right” after two discouraging outings on the mound.

GLENDALE, Ariz. — Dodgers ace Clayton Kershaw was shut down indefinitely after telling manager Dave Roberts that he “didn’t feel right” after two discouraging outings on the mound.

Kershaw worked out indoors at Camelback Ranch on Friday but didn’t play catch. Roberts wouldn’t speculate on the left-hander’s next bullpen session.

“Just going to take a few days. It’s just best if I do that,” Kershaw told reporters. “I’m not going to get another chance to do this during the season. It feels like it’s a good time. Hopefully be playing catch, if not this weekend, by the first of next week.”

Kershaw told Roberts he wasn’t feeling right after throwing live batting practice Monday and a bullpen session on Wednesday.

Roberts was unclear as to what exactly is going on with the three-time NL Cy Young Award winner, but the manager told reporters in Arizona “no one is alarmed or worried about it.”

Kershaw has dealt with back injuries the last three seasons and a left shoulder injury last year.

Roberts said Kershaw could be going through a so-called “dead-arm stage,” which can affect pitchers in spring training.

“There’s plenty of time for him to get his ‘pens in and build up,” the manager said. “He holds himself to a high standard. He really wasn’t pleased with how he felt. It’s sort of a day-to-day thing.”

Kershaw signed a $93 million, three-year contract in November and was named the opening day starter for the ninth consecutive year earlier this week. He turns 31 next month.

He had a 2.73 ERA last year.

Categories: Sports | MLB
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