Ex-Red Sox slugger David Ortiz flown to Boston after being shot in a bar | TribLIVE.com
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Ex-Red Sox slugger David Ortiz flown to Boston after being shot in a bar

Associated Press
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AP
David Ortiz led the Red Sox to three World Series titles and hit 541 home runs in his career.
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AP
Leo Ortiz, center, father of former Boston Red Sox slugger David Ortiz talks with relatives at the hospital where his son was hospitalized after being shot in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, Sunday, June 9, 2019. Ortiz was ambushed by a man who got off a motorcycle and shot him in the back at close range Sunday night in his native Dominican Republic, authorities said.
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AP
The director of the National Police, General Ney Aldrin Bautista Almonte talks to the press at the hospital where the former Boston Red Sox slugger David Ortiz was hospitalized after being shot in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, Sunday, June 9, 2019. Ortiz was ambushed by a man who got off a motorcycle and shot him in the back at close range Sunday night in his native Dominican Republic, authorities said.
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The Dial Bar and Lounge where former Boston Red Sox slugger David Ortiz was shot the previous night in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, Monday, June 10, 2019. Dominican National Police Director Ney Aldrin Bautista Almonte said Ortiz was at the bar around 8:50 p.m. Sunday when a gunman approached from behind and shot him at close range.

SANTO DOMINGO, Dominican Republic — David Ortiz was flown to Boston for more medical care Monday after the former Red Sox slugger was ambushed by a gunman at a bar in his native Dominican Republic, authorities said.

The 43-year-old was in stable condition in intensive care at a Santo Domingo hospital after doctors removed his gallbladder and part of his intestine, according to his spokesman, Leo Lopez. He said Ortiz’s liver also was damaged in the shooting Sunday night.

Ortiz is one of the most beloved figures in sports history in the Dominican Republic and Boston, a fearsome power hitter with a ready smile. He led the Red Sox to three World Series championships, was a 10-time All-Star and hit 541 home runs.

Dozens of fans crowded the hospital, causing a traffic jam. In the U.S., fans prayed for his recovery and wished him well, with New England Patriots receiver Julian Edelman assuring him on Instagram: “Papi, all of New England has your back.”

The Red Sox offered “all available resources” and sent an aircraft to bring him back to Boston.

“He’s on the Mount Rushmore of Boston sports,” said Eddie Romero, the team’s assistant general manager.

A specially equipped plane was expected to take Ortiz to the U.S. late Monday, said Luis Jose Lopez Mena, a spokesman for Las Americas airport.

Ortiz was at the Dial Bar and Lounge in Santo Domingo on Sunday night when a gunman approached from behind and shot him at close range in the torso, authorities said.

The gunman was not immediately identified or arrested, and the motive for the shooting was under investigation, with authorities trying to determine if Ortiz was the target.

The operator of the motorcycle that was carrying the gunman was captured and beaten by a crowd of people at the bar, authorities said.

Eliezer Salvador, who was at the scene, said the gunman said nothing, just fired once. Salvador then drove a wounded Ortiz to the hospital, telling reporters they had a brief conversation in the car as he urged the baseball great to stay calm and breathe.

“Do you have any problems with anyone?” Salvador recalled asking him, to which Ortiz replied: “No, my brother. I’ve never wronged anyone.”

Salvador held up Ortiz’s bloody belongings for reporters, along with some of his jewelry. He also apologized for hitting several cars while rushing to the hospital: “That wrongdoing was justified.”

Ortiz’s father, Leo, said he had no idea why someone would have shot at his son.

“He is resting,” the elder Ortiz said. “Big Papi will be around for a long time.”

Leo Ortiz added he is pleased with the medical attention his son has received, but he will be transferred to Boston so he can be with his wife and the Red Sox medical team.

Two other people were wounded, including Jhoel Lopez, a Dominican TV host who was with Ortiz. Police believe Lopez was wounded by the same bullet, said National Police Director Ney Aldrin Bautista Almonte. Lopez was shot in the leg, and his injuries were not life-threatening, said his wife, Liza Blanco, who also it a TV host.

Police did not identify the third person or detail that person’s injuries.

Ortiz, who retired after the 2016 season and lives at least part of the year in the Dominican Republic, had his No. 34 retired by the Red Sox in 2017, and Boston renamed a bridge and a stretch of road outside Fenway Park in his honor. He maintains a home in Weston, on the outskirts of Boston.

Categories: Sports | MLB
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