First Call: Steelers’ next opponent winless, too; Le’Veon Bell is bummed | TribLIVE.com
Breakfast With Benz

First Call: Steelers’ next opponent winless, too; Le’Veon Bell is bummed

Tim Benz
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AP
New York Jets running back Le’Veon Bell watches from the sideline of a NFL football game against the New England Patriots, Sunday, Sept. 22, 2019, in Foxborough, Mass.

In “First Call” this Monday, the next opponent for the Steelers is struggling badly, too. Le’Veon Bell is mad about Jets “haters.” Pitt alumnus LeSean “Shady” McCoy leads Chiefs.


Bummed-out Bell

Criticism of the Jets is getting noticed by Le’Veon Bell.

That 30-14 loss to the Patriots dropped the club to 0-3.

Bell kinda “went Casper” himself Sunday, didn’t he? The former Steelers running back averaged less than two yards per carry on the day, lugging the ball for just 35 yards on 18 attempts. He also gained a bland 48 yards on four catches.

But he’s addressing those fans, who haven’t turned against the Jets yet, for help.

Well, the Jets can’t possibly lose next week.

They have a bye.


Brady block

Nobody flirts with disaster in blowouts more than the Patriots.

Regardless of the score or situation, New England tends to leave its starters in the game, even if they are up big.

Case in point, check out this Patriots play call up 23 in the fourth quarter against the awful New York Jets.

Yup. That’s future Hall of Famer Tom Brady leading the way on a block during an end-around.

Sure. New England fans can fawn over Brady’s toughness and “play ‘til it’s over” attitude. But it’s not going to seem so great if Brady gets a significant injury on a meaningless play like that.

Don’t expect New England to change, though.


At least it’s the Bengals

You probably feel down in the dumps about the Steelers, sitting at 0-3 and without Ben Roethlisberger.

Here’s the good news. They’ve got the Bengals next week on “Monday Night Football.”

Cincinnati is 0-3, too. And this is how they lost their game to the Bills Sunday.

That’s a good point in that tweet.

But, knowing the Bengals, if they had been granted the safety, they would’ve gotten one huge play after the free kick.

Then they would’ve missed the field goal to win it.


Shady shout out

The Pitt Panthers scored a big victory with their “Immaculate Deception” play against Central Florida Saturday.

Then, one of the team’s most decorated NFL alumnus had a hand in helping the Kansas City Chiefs take out the Baltimore Ravens on Sunday.

LeSean “Shady” McCoy scored two touchdowns en route to a 33-28 Chiefs win.

McCoy had one TD receiving and one rushing. The former Panther ended up with 80 yards from scrimmage before leaving in the second half with an ankle injury.

The ankle had been bothering McCoy. He had an MRI last week. But it was deemed good enough to play until the problem flared up during the game.


Barkley’s bad news

New York Giants running back Saquon Barkley left the Giants’ win over Tampa Bay in a walking boot and crutches Sunday.

He insists he is not out for the season. But ProFootballTalk.com says that the former Penn State star has a high ankle sprain.

Barkley only had eight carries for 10 yards and four catches for 27 yards against the Bucs.

Tim Benz is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Tim at [email protected] or via Twitter. All tweets could be reposted. All emails are subject to publication unless specified otherwise.

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