Former Rangers and ‘Miracle on Ice’ player charged in attack | TribLIVE.com
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Former Rangers and ‘Miracle on Ice’ player charged in attack

Associated Press
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AP
This undated photo provided by the Cook County Jail via the Star Tribune shows Mark Pavelich, a former New York Rangers player and forward for the 1980 “Miracle on Ice” Olympic team.

GRAND MARAIS, Minn. — Mark Pavelich, a forward on the 1980 “Miracle on Ice” U.S. Olympic hockey team who went on to play for the New York Rangers and two other NHL teams, has been charged with assault for allegedly beating a neighbor with a metal pole and breaking several of the man’s bones.

The 61-year-old Pavelich attacked his neighbor last week at Pavelich’s home in the small Lake Superior community of Lutsen, Minnesota, after they returned from fishing, authorities allege in the criminal complaint. Pavelich told investigators he believed the man had “spiked” his beer, leading to the alleged attack, it states.

First responders found the neighbor in shock with “obvious disfigurement of his leg,” KMSP-TV reported. He also had a bruised kidney, two cracked ribs and a fractured vertebra.

Pavelich faces charges of second- and third-degree assault, possession of an illegal shotgun and receiving a gun with an altered or missing serial number. During a hearing Monday in Cook County District Court, the judge ordered a mental competency hearing for Pavelich, who didn’t have an attorney listed in online court records as of Wednesday.

He remains in custody in lieu of $250,000 bail, the Star Tribune reported.

Pavelich played five seasons with the Rangers and parts of one season each with the Minnesota North Stars and San Jose Sharks, potting 137 goals and dishing out 192 assists in his 355 NHL games. He also played professionally in Europe.

Pavelich had two assists in the United States’ “Miracle” 4-3 win over the Soviet Union in the semifinals of the 1980 Olympic tournament. The United States went on to beat Finland in the finals to win the gold medal.

In 2012, his 44-year-old wife, Kara, died in an accidental fall from a second-story balcony at their home. Two years later, Pavelich sold his gold medal for $262,900 through an auction house, saying he wanted to help his adult daughter.

Categories: Sports | NHL
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