Franklin Regional grad Jackson finishes tied for 7th in Boys Junior PGA Championship | TribLIVE.com
U.S./World Sports

Franklin Regional grad Jackson finishes tied for 7th in Boys Junior PGA Championship

Associated Press

HARTFORD, Conn. — Jack Heath made a 40-foot birdie putt from the fringe on the par-4 18th hole for an 8-under-par 62 and a one-stroke victory Friday in the Boys Junior PGA Championship.

“I knew if it went in, I would most likely win, and it went in,” Heath said. “It’s why I play golf.”

Franklin Regional graduate Palmer Jackson, a Notre Dame recruit, shot 69 and finished tied for seventh at 15-under.

Heath, a 17-year-old from Charlotte, N.C., finished at 21-under 259 at Keney Park Golf Course to break the tournament record of 266 set by Akshay Bhatia in 2017. Heath also broke the final-round record, making two eagles, six birdies and two bogeys.

“This means the world to me,” said Heath, a rising senior at Charlotte Catholic High School who recently committed to San Diego State. “I worked hard over the past year and a half, and it’s paid off. It’s a great feeling.”

Heath played the final seven holes in 6-under, hitting a 190-yard shot to 20 feet to set up the eagle on the par-5 14th. He holed out from 45 yards with a lob wedge on the par-5 second hole for the first eagle.

Canon Claycomb, a 17-year-old Alabama recruit from Bowling Green, Ky., shot a 66 to finish second. Andy Mao of Johns Creek, Ga., was third at 19-under after a 66. Brett Roberts of Coral Springs, Fla., had a 64 to get to 18-under.

Third-round leader Jake Beber-Frankel, the 17-year-old son of Academy Award-winning director David Frankel, had a 71 to drop into fifth at 18-under. Beber-Frankel, from Miami, shot a tournament-record 60 in the second round.


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