ShareThis Page
Other High School Sports

QV lacrosse standout Foster leaves her mark

| Wednesday, July 29, 2015, 3:12 p.m.
Quaker Valley High School recent graduate Kayla Foster participates in drills during a lacrosse camp she was helping coach Nellie Kraus run Wednesday, July 22, 2015. Foster was named an Academic All-American.
Kristina Serafini | Trib Total Media
Quaker Valley High School recent graduate Kayla Foster participates in drills during a lacrosse camp she was helping coach Nellie Kraus run Wednesday, July 22, 2015. Foster was named an Academic All-American.
Quaker Valley High School recent graduate Kayla Foster participates in drills during a lacrosse camp she was helping coach Nellie Kraus run Wednesday, July 22, 2015. Foster was named an Academic All-American.
Kristina Serafini | Trib Total Media
Quaker Valley High School recent graduate Kayla Foster participates in drills during a lacrosse camp she was helping coach Nellie Kraus run Wednesday, July 22, 2015. Foster was named an Academic All-American.

Even though lacrosse is a team sport, one way to be recognized on an individual basis is by being named an Academic All-American.

This is an honor that only a few have been blessed with in the Quaker Valley girls lacrosse program.

Kayla Foster, who scored 71 goals and recorded 96 assists in her senior season, was honored by being named an All-American. Foster is the first Quaker Valley girls lacrosse players to be so honored since Alexia Pereira in 2010.

“I'm super thankful, and I wouldn't have gotten it if it wasn't for my team. We worked hard to get where we were. I owe it to my my teammates and my coaches for getting me where I am today,” Foster said.

Foster, who will move on to play lacrosse at Liberty next season, led Quaker Valley to the semifinals of the PIAA Division I playoffs, where the Quakers fell to the eventual state champions, Garnet Valley, 13-10.

Since the season came to a close, Foster has been preparing for the college game and has been giving back to the community by participating in a summer lacrosse camp run by Nellie Kraus, the Quaker Valley girls coach.

“I actually got a chance to help them out and play with them. I think everybody when they have a chance should give back as much as possible to the community and to the sport,” Foster said.

Kraus was excited to have someone with Foster's skill level participating in her camp.

“I feel like having her play with the eight or nine freshmen at the camp helped them learn a lot from her. This camp was a big change for them, and I feel like it was a great for them to play along with her and her skills,” Kraus said. “I feel like you can learn a lot from watching and playing with someone at a higher level. It's great for the skill level.”

Foster, who played three years with the Pittsburgh Premier Lacrosse Club, has been developing her game and her fitness for the college game.

Foster has been thankful for the opportunities lacrosse at Quaker Valley and the Pittsburgh Premier Lacrosse Club has created for her, especially with the ability to play Division I lacrosse the next four seasons.

“Lacrosse is a growing sport, and it all starts with the younger kids. I was so happy to see all the kids there since they are the future of Quaker Valley lacrosse.”

Andrew John is freelance writer.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me