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Ichiro walks off into history in ‘sayonara’ at Tokyo Dome | TribLIVE.com
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Ichiro walks off into history in ‘sayonara’ at Tokyo Dome

Associated Press
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AP
Mariners right fielder Ichiro Suzuki waves to spectators while leaving the field in the eighth inning against the Oakland Athletics at Tokyo Dome on Thursday, March 21, 2019. It was Ichiro’s final game.

TOKYO — At times, it seemed as if he’d go on hitting forever.

But Thursday night, a player who defined baseball at its very best on two continents for a generation, took his final swing.

The great Ichiro has said “sayonara.”

Now 45, Ichiro Suzuki left the Tokyo Dome field in the eighth inning, waving goodbye to the packed crowd amid hugs from Seattle Mariners teammates in a three-minute walk that signaled to all his monumental run was over.

“I have ended by career and decided to retire,” Ichiro said, speaking in Japanese at a news conference after a 5-4 win over Oakland in 12 innings.

He said his contract was through the two games in Japan, and said he decided before arriving last week to step away.

“After the reception I got today, how could I possibly have any regrets?” he said. “I couldn’t play well enough in spring training to earn an extension.”

Ichiro went 0 for 4 in his farewell. In his last at-bat, he came up with two outs, a runner on second and a tie score in the eighth. He hit a slow grounder to shortstop and, still hustling the whole way, was barely thrown out at first.

He took his spot in right field in the eighth, then was pulled by manager Scott Servais, and the walk into history began in front of a sellout of 45,000. He strolled in, turned and waved to the crowd with all of the usually reserved Japanese fans on their feet.

To chants of “Ichiro, Ichiro, Ichiro” he was greeted at the dugout — and later in the dugout — by emotional embraces from teammates.

Yusei Kikuchi, the Japanese rookie pitcher who started the game in his big league debut, openly broke down crying when he embraced Ichiro.

Kikuchi later took a full minute to compose himself before responding about Ichiro’s impact. And he cried when the two embraced in the dugout after the game.

“Since spring training to this day, Ichiro told us it is a gift for him to play in Tokyo,” Kikuchi said through a translator. “But for me, he gave me the greatest gift that I can play with him.”

Yet when Mariners teammate Dee Gordon bowed, Ichiro broke into a laugh — like, “not necessary, bro.”

Oakland players stood solemnly and watched camera flashes and iPhones catch the historic scene. All over the stadium signs read: “Ichiro we love you” and “Ichiro is Life.” Fans wore his famous No. 51 in all shades, colors and from all eras.

The fans got one more chance to salute when he came back on the field after the game and acknowledged their ovations.

Ichiro was 0 for 5 in the two regular-season games against the A’s in Tokyo, leaving him with 3,089 hits in 19 seasons — a sure Hall of Fame resume. He had 1,278 before that over nine years in Japan, making him baseball’s all-time hits leader.

Ichiro struggled in spring training. with only two hits in 25 at-bats. And in two exhibition games in Tokyo against the Tokyo Giants. he was 0 for 6.

“I really wanted to play until I was 50, but I couldn’t do it,” he said. “It was a way of motivating myself and, if I’d never said it, I don’t think I would have come this far.”

Ichiro praised his countrymen, who are famous for being reserved. Not tonight. Not on this night.

“Japanese people I have always thought don’t in general express themselves,” he said. “But today’s experience blew that away. They were incredibly passionate tonight.

“When I look back on my career, I know I will remember today as the most memorable day, without a doubt.”

Categories: Sports | MLB
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