Ichiro walks off into history in ‘sayonara’ at Tokyo Dome | TribLIVE.com
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Ichiro walks off into history in ‘sayonara’ at Tokyo Dome

Associated Press
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AP
Seattle Mariners right fielder Ichiro Suzuki waves to spectators while leaving the field for defensive substitution in the eighth inning of Game 2 of the Major League baseball opening series against the Oakland Athletics at Tokyo Dome in Tokyo, Thursday, March 21, 2019.
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AP
Seattle Mariners right fielder Ichiro Suzuki stretches on the field prior to Game 2 of the Major League baseball opening series between the Mariners and the Oakland Athletics at Tokyo Dome in Tokyo, Thursday, March 21, 2019. Ichiro is in the starting lineup for the Mariners in what might be his last game in the majors. Japanese in the background reads: “Ultraman.”
913405_web1_913405-d505885d9e904a4489687d4a3cee7f3f
AP
Seattle Mariners right fielder Ichiro Suzuki waves to spectators while leaving the field for defensive substitution in the eighth inning of Game 2 of the Major League baseball opening series against the Oakland Athletics at Tokyo Dome in Tokyo, Thursday, March 21, 2019.
913405_web1_913405-cc987cafe9f7469b94925363aeedc4da
AP
Seattle Mariners right fielder Ichiro Suzuki looks down during the team’s batting practice prior to Game 2 of the Major League baseball opening series between the Mariners and the Oakland Athletics at Tokyo Dome in Tokyo, Thursday, March 21, 2019. Ichiro is in the starting lineup for the Mariners in what might be his last game in the majors.
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AP
Seattle Mariners right fielder Ichiro Suzuki runs during the team’s batting practice prior to Game 2 of the Major League baseball opening series between the Mariners and the Oakland Athletics at Tokyo Dome in Tokyo, Thursday, March 21, 2019. Ichiro is in the starting lineup for the Mariners in what might be his last game in the majors.

TOKYO — Ichiro Suzuki has said “sayonara.”

The 45-year-old Seattle Mariners star announced his retirement Thursday night, shortly after waving goodbye at the Tokyo Dome during a 5-4 win over Oakland in 12 innings.

Ichiro went 0 for 4 and was pulled from right field in the eighth, saluting his adoring fans in the packed crowd. He drew hugs from teammates in a three-minute walk that signaled to all his great career had ended.

The outfielder said in a statement after the game that he had “achieved so many of my dreams in baseball, both in my career in Japan and, since 2001, in Major League Baseball.”

He added that he was “honored to end my big league career where it started, with Seattle, and think it is fitting that my last games as a professional were played in my home country of Japan.”

Ichiro was a 10-time All-Star in the majors. He got 3,089 hits over a 19-year career in the big leagues after getting 1,278 while starring in Japan. His combined total of 4,367 is a professional record.

Categories: Sports | MLB
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