Josh Bell’s 3 home runs lead Pirates’ 18-5 win over Cubs | TribLIVE.com
Pirates/MLB

Josh Bell’s 3 home runs lead Pirates’ 18-5 win over Cubs

Jerry DiPaola
1360202_web1_GTR-Bucs05-070219
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Pirates first baseman Josh Bell celebrates his two-run home run with Adam Frazier during the second inning against the Cubs Monday, July 1, 2019, at PNC Park.
1360202_web1_GTR-Bucs01-070219
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Pirates first baseman Josh Bell hits a three-run home run next to Cubs catcher Victor Caratini during the first inning Monday, July 1, 2019, at PNC Park.
1360202_web1_GTR-Bucs02-070219
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Pirates first baseman Josh Bell celebrates his three-run home run during the first inning against the Cubs Monday, July 1, 2019, at PNC Park.
1360202_web1_GTR-Bucs03-070219
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Pirates pitcher Trevor Williams delivers during the first inning against the Cubs Monday, July 1, 2019, at PNC Park.
1360202_web1_GTR-Bucs04-070219
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Pirates shortstop Jung Ho Kang is hit by a pitch during the first inning against the Cubs Monday, July 1, 2019, at PNC Park.
1360202_web1_GTR-Bucs06-070219
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
The Cubs’ Victor Caratini scores past Pirates catcher Elias Diaz during the fourth inning Monday, July 1, 2019, at PNC Park.
1360202_web1_GTR-Bucs10-070219
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Pirates first baseman Josh Bell watches his third home run of the night during the eighth inning against the Cubs Monday, July 1, 2019, at PNC Park.
1360202_web1_GTR-Bucs08-070219
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Pirates first baseman Josh Bell celebrates his third home run of the night with Colin Moran during the eighth inning against the Cubs Monday, July 1, 2019, at PNC Park.
1360202_web1_GTR-Bucs09-070219
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Pirates first baseman Josh Bell gets a curtain call after hitting his third home run of the night against the Cubs Monday, July 1, 2019, at PNC Park.
1360202_web1_GTR-Bucs07-070219
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Pirates first baseman Josh Bell gets the water cooler treatment from pitcher Chris Archer after his three-home run night in an 18-5 win over the Cubs Monday, July 1, 2019, at PNC Park.
1360202_web1_GTR-Bucs13-070219
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Pirates second baseman Adam Frazier celebrates one of his four doubles next to Cubs shortstop Javier Baez Monday, July 1, 2019, at PNC Park.
1360202_web1_GTR-Bucs12-070219
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Pirates first baseman Josh Bell singles during the fourth inning against the Cubs Monday, July 1, 2019, at PNC Park.
1360202_web1_GTR-Bucs11-070219
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Pirates shortstop Jung Ho Kang robs the Cubs’ Javier Baez ofa hit during the fifth inning Monday, July 1, 2019, at PNC Park.
1360202_web1_GTR-Bucs14-070219
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
The Cubs’ Albert Almora Jr. reacts after being tagged out by Pirates third baseman Colin Moran, as umpire Joe West makes the call Monday, July 1, 2019, at PNC Park.
1360202_web1_GTR-Bucs15-070219
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Pirates shortstop Jung Ho Kang his two-run home run with Colin Moran against the Cubs Monday, July 1, 2019, at PNC Park.

On a night when even Elias Diaz’s groundout traveled 108.2 mph, Clint Hurdle reflected on how the game of baseball has changed.

And his thoughts went far beyond the Pittsburgh Pirates’ 18-5 victory Monday night against the National League- Central-leading Chicago Cubs.

It’s how suddenly the baseball was jumping off the bats that helped the Pirates collect:

• A total of 23 hits (four short of a 97-year-old franchise record).

• Five home runs, with Josh Bell becoming the 11th player in team history to hit three in a game (20th time).

• Five hits each from Adam Frazier and Colin Moran, the first time two Pirates teammates have done that since 2010.

• Four doubles by Frazier, tying a major-league record. It’s a feat accomplished many times, but Frazier and Hall of Famer Paul Waner, who did it in 1932, are the only Pirates players to do it.

“MLB history, that’s a long time,” Frazier said. “You sit back and think about that, it’s pretty cool … especially with a Hall of Famer like Waner.”

All of those numbers indicate the Pirates are continuing an amazing growth at the plate. After hitting .231 through April, their average climbed to .253 at the end of May to .264 on Sunday (the last day of June) to .268 currently after the team hit .500 (23 for 46) against the Cubs on Monday.

“A swinging bat’s a dangerous bat,” Hurdle said. “That’s something I’ve always believed in. Aggressive swings, the balls are in the zone, hunting good, just having some fun.”

But it’s not just the balls finding grass in the outfield.

“The velocity is really grabbing my attention, off the bat velocities,” the Pirates’ manager said.

The Pirates and Cubs entertained a PNC Park crowd of 17,772 with 25 hits (among a total of 38) that left bats at more than 100 mph, led by .162 hitter Jung Ho Kang’s 111.1 mph home run, according to baseballreference.com.

Two of Bell’s home runs had exit velocities from the batter’s box of more than 109 mph and they traveled 402 and 404 feet, respectively.

He also singled twice, drove in seven runs and chased the Cubs’ Kyle Schwarber to the warning track in left field to track down an out. Bell finished the first day of July with 25 home runs and 77 RBIs. And nearly half a season remains to be played.

“He has my vote for July player of the month,” pitcher Trevor Williams said.

Bell, who was hitting .345 with 18 homers on May 29, had his average fall to .301 in June.

“Balls in the zone I was missing,” he said. “Balls out of the zone, I was nowhere near. Hopefully, that chapter’s closed and I can start a new one in July.”

But Bell’s homers weren’t the longest Monday night. That distinction belonged to Jose Osuna’s fourth pinch-hit homer of the season that traveled 422 feet.

“The game, it’s changed,” Hurdle said. “The actual offensive landscape, the swings are bigger.”

But it’s not just big linebacker-sized men such as Bell flexing their muscles.

“I think the biggest thing, more often than not, there’s not as much pitching in the game,” Hurdle said. “There’s a lot more throwing. “The guys who can change speeds and hit spots, there’s still an art to pitching.

“Distances are real. It’s not any one place. You can say Colorado, but balls are traveling everywhere. If they’re looking for more offense in our game, we’ve walked into that horizon.”

What was equally intriguing about the game, however, was how Williams, the winning pitcher, muddled through 5 2/3 innings, allowing nine hits, three walks and five runs, including Javier Baez’s 402-foot homer.

Williams, who had an RBI single in the fourth, has had problems finding his rhythm since returning from the injured list (side strain) three starts ago. He’s surrendered 16 runs and 26 hits in 17 1/3 innings.

“Thankfully, I had such a big cushion from the guys,” he said.

But he made a tone-setting pitch to Anthony Rizzo with the Pirates ahead, 7-4, in the fourth inning. He got the Cubs’ slugging first baseman to pop out to second base with the bases loaded.

“A click of the bat we’re down by one,” Hurdle said. “Trevor put a foot down and gave us another inning. He didn’t give up the big hit at that time with a really good hitter at the plate.”

The Cubs pitchers couldn’t say the same, and now the Pirates (40-43) are only four games out of first place in the National League Central.

Love baseball? Stay up-to-date with the latest Pittsburgh Pirates news.

Jerry DiPaola is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Jerry by email at [email protected]web.com or via Twitter .

Categories: Sports | Pirates
TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.