Man behind shooting of David Ortiz in custody | TribLIVE.com
MLB

Man behind shooting of David Ortiz in custody

Associated Press
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World Team Manager David Ortiz (34) speaks with U.S. Team Manager Torrii Hunter, before the All-Star Futures baseball game, Sunday, July 15, 2018, at Nationals Park, in Washington. The the 89th MLB baseball All-Star Game will be played Tuesday. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

SANTO DOMINGO, Dominican Republic — Authorities in the Dominican Republic announced Friday they arrested the man behind the shooting of baseball great David Ortiz in an apparent case of mistaken identity.

Police said Victor Hugo Gomez was detained in the Caribbean country. No further details immediately were released.

Authorities said last week they believed Gomez was living in the U.S. and described him as a dangerous fugitive, adding he was an associate of Mexico’s Gulf Cartel.

He is accused of ordering the killing of his cousin, Sixto David Fernandez. Authorities said hit men confused Ortiz with Fernandez during the June 9 shooting at a bar in the capital of Santo Domingo. The two men are friends and were sharing a table.

Carlos Rubio, Gomez’s attorney, did not immediately return a message for comment. However, he posted a seven-minute video on YouTube on Friday in which his client talks about the case.

“I would never do something like this,” Gomez said, adding he did not try to kill his cousin, “and least of all David, ‘Big Papi.’ “

Gomez, who was wearing a gray T-shirt and a khaki cap, said he made the video because he fears for his life and wanted to reject the accusations as he called on police to investigate the case more deeply.

“I want to clarify that I have nothing to do with any attempt on the life against Sixto David Fernandez,” he said. “We’re family.”

Gomez then spent most of the video accusing Fernandez of having ties to drug traffickers, saying many people would back up his claims.

Fernandez did not return a message for comment.

Authorities said at a recent news conference Gomez wanted Fernandez killed because he believed his cousin turned him into Dominican drug investigators in 2011. They said Gomez then spent time in prison in the Dominican Republic with one of at least 11 suspects arrested in the shooting.

Gomez later resurfaced in the U.S. as one of dozens of suspects sought by federal authorities after a March 2019 drug trafficking sting in Houston.

In the video, Gomez said he did not turn himself into U.S. authorities because he was not home at the time and because he could not afford a lawyer or post bond.

Police said Fernandez received several threatening messages from Gomez prior to the shooting but did not provide a time frame.

On Friday, authorities also announced the arrest of another suspect, Alberto Rodriguez Mota, who is accused of paying the hit men some $8,000. Police said he was captured off the eastern coast of the Dominican Republic en route to Puerto Rico.

Meanwhile, Ortiz remained hospitalized in Boston and was expected to recover after doctors in the Dominican Republic removed his gallbladder and part of his intestine. Ortiz was moved out of intensive care nearly a week ago.

Categories: Sports | MLB
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