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MLB

MLB notebook: Thousands attending Taveras' burial

| Tuesday, Oct. 28, 2014, 7:03 p.m.

• Cardinals general manager John Mozeliak and manager Mike Matheny attended the funeral of former outfielder Oscar Taveras on Tuesday. Thousands of people in the Dominican Republic are attending the burial. The slugger's father, Francisco Taveras, thanked the crowd for coming and teared up as he spoke at the cemetery. “I'm extremely devastated about what has happened,” he said. “I urge young people to wear their seatbelts and to learn from what happened to my son.” Taveras died Sunday after authorities say he lost control of his car on a highway in Puerto Plata. In Kansas City, there was a moment of silence before Game 6 of the World Series. He was one of the majors' top prospects and hit .239 with three homers and 22 RBIs in 80 games this year.

• The Blue Jays claimed Mariners first baseman Justin Smoak off waivers. The 27-year-old Smoak appeared in 80 games for the Mariners last season, batting .202 with seven home runs and 30 RBIs.

• Twins prospect Byron Buxton suffered another setback. The top pick in the 2011 draft dislocated a finger in the Arizona Fall League.

• Former baseball star Jose Canseco underwent surgery after he accidentally nearly shot his finger off in his Las Vegas home Tuesday night, his fiancee told the Los Angeles Times. The shooting happened about 3 p.m. while Canseco was cleaning his gun at the kitchen table.

— Wire reports

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