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Nation, World Sports

Longtime sportscaster Dick Enberg found dead at home at 82

| Friday, Dec. 22, 2017, 7:06 p.m.
FILE - In this Sept. 29, 2016, file photo, Dick Enberg, the voice of the San Diego Padres, poses in his booth prior to the Padres' final home baseball game of the season in San Diego. Enberg, the sportscaster who got his big break with UCLA basketball and went on to call Super Bowls, Olympics, Final Fours and Angels and Padres baseball games, died Thursday, Dec. 21, 2017. He was 82. Engberg's daughter, Nicole, confirmed the death to The Associated Press. She said the family became concerned when he didn't arrive on his flight to Boston on Thursday, and that he was found dead at his home in La Jolla, a San Diego neighborhood. (AP Photo/Lenny Ignelzi, File)
FILE - In this Sept. 29, 2016, file photo, Dick Enberg, the voice of the San Diego Padres, poses in his booth prior to the Padres' final home baseball game of the season in San Diego. Enberg, the sportscaster who got his big break with UCLA basketball and went on to call Super Bowls, Olympics, Final Fours and Angels and Padres baseball games, died Thursday, Dec. 21, 2017. He was 82. Engberg's daughter, Nicole, confirmed the death to The Associated Press. She said the family became concerned when he didn't arrive on his flight to Boston on Thursday, and that he was found dead at his home in La Jolla, a San Diego neighborhood. (AP Photo/Lenny Ignelzi, File)

SAN DIEGO — Dick Enberg, a Hall of Fame broadcaster known as much for his excited calls of “Oh my!” as the big events he covered during a 60-year career, died. He was 82.

Enberg's daughter, Nicole Enberg Vaz, confirmed the death to the Associated Press. She said the family became concerned when her father didn't arrive Thursday on his flight to Boston, and he was found dead at his home in La Jolla, a San Diego neighborhood, with his bags packed.

His daughter said the family believes Enberg died of a heart attack but was awaiting official word.

“It's very, very, very shocking,” said Vaz, who lives in Boston. “He'd been busy with two podcasts and was full of energy.”

Enberg's wife, Barbara, already was in Boston and was expecting his arrival.

The family “is grateful for the kind thoughts and prayers of all of Dick's countless fans and dear friends,” according to a statement released by Enberg's attorney, Dennis Coleman. “At this time we are all still processing the significant loss, and we ask for prayers and respectful privacy in the immediate aftermath of such untimely news.”

Enberg got his big break with UCLA basketball and went on to call Super Bowls, Olympics, Final Fours and Angels and Padres baseball games as well as Rams football games.

He retired from his TV job with the Padres in October 2016, capping a six-decade career punctuated with countless calls of “Oh my!” in describing big plays. He also was well known for his baseball catchphrase of “Touch 'em all!” for home runs.

During his nine years broadcasting UCLA basketball, the Bruins won eight NCAA titles under coach John Wooden. Enberg broadcast nine no-hitters, including two by San Francisco's Tim Lincecum against the Padres in 2013 and '14.

He said the most historically important event he covered was “The Game of the Century,” Houston's victory over UCLA in 1968 that snapped the Bruins' 47-game winning streak.

Enberg's many former broadcast partners included Merlin Olsen, Al McGuire, Billy Packer, Don Drysdale and Tony Gwynn.

Enberg went into the broadcasters' wing of the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2015 as the recipient of the Ford C. Frick Award.

“There will never be another Dick Enberg,” CBS Sports chairman Sean McManus said. “As the voice of generations of fans, Dick was a masterful storyteller, a consummate professional and a true gentleman. He was one of the true legends of our business.”

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