ShareThis Page
Nation, World Sports

Georgia outlasts Oklahoma to reach title game

| Monday, Jan. 1, 2018, 9:39 p.m.
Georgia's Sony Michel scores the winning touchdown against Oklahoma in the Rose Bowl on Jan. 1, 2018, in Pasadena, Calif.
Getty Images
Georgia's Sony Michel scores the winning touchdown against Oklahoma in the Rose Bowl on Jan. 1, 2018, in Pasadena, Calif.
Georgia linebacker Lorenzo Carter blocks a field goal attempted by Oklahoma kicker Austin Seibert during overtime in the Rose Bowl on Jan. 1, 2018, in Pasadena, Calif.
Georgia linebacker Lorenzo Carter blocks a field goal attempted by Oklahoma kicker Austin Seibert during overtime in the Rose Bowl on Jan. 1, 2018, in Pasadena, Calif.
Linebacker Lorenzo Carter of Georgia celebrates with a fan after winning the Rose Bowl on Jan. 1, 2018, in Pasadena, Calif.
Getty Images
Linebacker Lorenzo Carter of Georgia celebrates with a fan after winning the Rose Bowl on Jan. 1, 2018, in Pasadena, Calif.
Georgia's Nick Chubb and Isaiah Wynn celebrate after Chubb scores a touchdown against Oklahoma in the Rose Bowl on Jan. 1, 2018, in Pasadena, Calif.
Getty Images
Georgia's Nick Chubb and Isaiah Wynn celebrate after Chubb scores a touchdown against Oklahoma in the Rose Bowl on Jan. 1, 2018, in Pasadena, Calif.

PASADENA, Calif. — Sony Michel burst through the line for a 27-yard touchdown run to give No. 3 Georgia a 54-48 victory Monday night against No. 2 Oklahoma, winning the first overtime Rose Bowl and sending the Bulldogs to the College Football Playoff championship game.

Michel, who had a fumble in the fourth quarter returned for a go-ahead Oklahoma touchdown, ran for 181 yards and three scores for the Bulldogs (13-1), but none bigger than the last one in the second overtime.

In the final game of one of the great college careers, Oklahoma's Baker Mayfield threw for 287 yards and two touchdowns, and caught a touchdown pass that gave the Sooners a 17-point lead with 6 seconds left in the first half.

But the Heisman Trophy winner could not get the Sooners into the end zone in the first overtime when a touchdown would have ended the game.

The Bulldogs will play either Alabama or Clemson on Jan. 8 for the national championship in Atlanta, about 90 miles from their campus — with a chance to win their first national title since 1980.

The first overtime Rose Bowl was also the highest scoring, surpassing last year's 52-49 USC victory against Penn State. There was a lot more on the line in this one, which will go down as one of the greatest Granddaddies of Them All.

After an offside penalty on Georgia gave Oklahoma a first down on third-and-five in the second OT possession, the Sooners stalled again and Austin Seibert came out for a 27-yard field goal. Leaping through the line, Lorenzo Carter got his outstretched hand on the kick and the ball fluttered down short of the uprights.

Any score would have ended it for the Bulldogs, and on the second play Michel slipped one tackle and was home free. The Bulldogs sprinted off the sideline and toward the corner of the end zone to mob Michel. Confetti rained down. Meanwhile, Mayfield stood motionless on the sideline for several seconds, bent over with his hands on his knees and head down.

Michel and his running mate Nick Chubb were awesome for Georgia. Chubb ran for 145 yards and two touchdowns, including a 2-yarder on a direct snap with 55 seconds left in regulation to tie it.

Both teams settled for field goals in the first overtime, first Georgia's Rodrigo Blankenship from 38 to make it 48-45.

Then it was Mayfield's turn. A touchdown would have sent the Sooners to Atlanta, but on a third-and-2 from the 17 Georgia All-America linebacker Roquan Smith nailed Jordan Smallwood a yard short of the first down.

Seibert kicked a 33-yarder and the Bulldogs and Sooners played on, but not for much longer.

The first meeting between the storied programs was an instant classic.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me