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Nation, World Sports

A Westminster wow: Flynn the bichon frise becomes America's top dog

| Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018, 12:36 a.m.
Flynn the Bichon Frise, with handler Bill McFadden, poses after it won 'Best in Show' at the Westminster Kennel Club 142nd Annual Dog Show in Madison Square Garden in New York Feb. 13, 2018.
AFP/Getty Images
Flynn the Bichon Frise, with handler Bill McFadden, poses after it won 'Best in Show' at the Westminster Kennel Club 142nd Annual Dog Show in Madison Square Garden in New York Feb. 13, 2018.
Handler Katie Bernardin leads Ty, a giant schnauzer, in the working group competition during the 142nd Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show, Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018, at Madison Square Garden in New York. Ty won best in working group.
Associated Press
Handler Katie Bernardin leads Ty, a giant schnauzer, in the working group competition during the 142nd Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show, Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018, at Madison Square Garden in New York. Ty won best in working group.
Handler Ernesto Lara leads Winston, a Norfolk terrier, in the ring during the terrier group competition during the 142nd Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show, Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018, at Madison Square Garden in New York. Winston won best in the terrier group.
Associated Press
Handler Ernesto Lara leads Winston, a Norfolk terrier, in the ring during the terrier group competition during the 142nd Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show, Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018, at Madison Square Garden in New York. Winston won best in the terrier group.

NEW YORK — Flynn the bichon frise won best in show at the Westminster Kennel Club on Tuesday night, a choice that seemed to surprise almost everyone in the crowd at Madison Square Garden.

Fans who had been loudly shouting for their favorites fell into stunned silence when judge Betty-Anne Stenmark announced her decision.

No matter, the white powder puff was picked and walked off as America's top dog.

Guided by expert handler Bill McFadden, Flynn beat out Ty the giant schnauzer, Biggie the pug, Bean the Sussex spaniel, Lucy the borzoi, Slick the border collie and Winston the Norfolk terrier.

"It feels a little unreal," McFadden said. "I came in expecting nothing except hoping for a good performance, and I think I got it."

Underdogs and upsets are way more than the norm on the green carpet of the Garden.

Ty came into this competition as the nation's No. 1 show dog last year and finished as the runner-up. He endeared himself to the crowd by jumping up and putting his front paws around handler Katie Bernardin after winning the working group earlier in the evening.

Cheers of "Let's go, Biggie!" bounced all arena for the popular pug. And Bean was a clear crowd favorite, the way he sat up straight on his hind legs and begged judges for the biggest treat in dogdom.

Almost 6, Flynn posted his 42nd career best in show victory in what is almost certainly his last show before retiring.

The famed JR was the only other bichon to win Westminster, in 2001. McFadden has enjoyed success at the Garden, having guided Mick the Kerry blue terrier to the title in 2003.

Flynn won't get much rest before beginning his victory lap. Wednesday's schedule includes visits to the morning TV news shows, a steak lunch at Sardi's, a trip to the top of the Empire State Building and possibly a walk-on part at a Broadway show.

The Westminster-winning team gets no prize money. Instead, there's a shiny bowl, lucrative breeding fees and, most of all, a lifetime of memories.

The 142nd Westminster event drew 2,882 entries in 202 breeds and varieties. Among those who didn't quite make the cut: face-licking Spicy Nacho the miniature bull terrier who drew laughs, just not the judge's look.

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