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Nation, World Sports

Suspect confesses in killing of Olympic figure skater Denis Ten

| Friday, July 20, 2018, 7:15 a.m.
FILE - In this Feb. 16, 2018 file photo, figure skater Denis Ten, of Kazakhstan, reacts as his score is posted following his performance in the men’s short program figure skating, in the Gangneung Ice Arena at the 2018 Winter Olympics in Gangneung, South Korea. Prosecutors in Kazakhstan said Thursday, July 19, 2018, that Olympic figure skating medalist Denis Ten has been killed, and they are treating the case as murder.
FILE - In this Feb. 16, 2018 file photo, figure skater Denis Ten, of Kazakhstan, reacts as his score is posted following his performance in the men’s short program figure skating, in the Gangneung Ice Arena at the 2018 Winter Olympics in Gangneung, South Korea. Prosecutors in Kazakhstan said Thursday, July 19, 2018, that Olympic figure skating medalist Denis Ten has been killed, and they are treating the case as murder.

MOSCOW — One of two men detained in Kazakhstan on suspicion of killing Olympic figure skating medalist Denis Ten has confessed, authorities said Friday.

Prosecutor Berik Zhuyrektayev said in a televised statement that Nuraly Kiyasov “confessed his guilt in the presence of an attorney” while being questioned over the 25-year-old skater’s death Thursday in the Kazakh city of Almaty.

The prosecutor didn’t give further details of what exactly Kiyasov had said.

Police have also detained 23-year-old Arman Kudaibergenov in connection with Ten’s death, which has prompted national mourning. Authorities released a picture of the disheveled-looking man being held by masked men wearing body armor and camouflage uniforms.

Ten was stabbed after a dispute with people who allegedly tried to steal a mirror from his car in his home city of Almaty. He died in hospital of massive blood loss from multiple wounds, the Kazinform news agency said.

Prosecutors are treating his death as murder.

Kazinform reported that Kiyasov was taken to the scene of the crime under heavy security Friday as part of the investigation.

Ten’s bronze in Sochi in 2014 made him Kazakhstan’s first Olympic medalist in figure skating. He also won the Four Continents championships in 2015, and was a world championship silver medalist in 2013.

He struggled with injuries in recent years and could only finish 27th at the Pyeongchang Olympics in February.

Ten had been working on a script in recent months which the Kazakh-Russian director Timur Bekmambetov said Friday would now be turned into a movie.

“We’re definitely going to try to realize his idea and shoot a film dedicated to this multi-talented person,” Bekmambetov said in comments released by Kazakhstan’s embassy to Russia. “In his 25 years, Ten managed to do very much and had grand plans which he would surely have put into practice because he was a real hard worker.”

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