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Florida State's Winston wins Heisman in a landslide

| Saturday, Dec. 14, 2013, 10:21 p.m.
Florida State quarterback Jameis Winston poses after winning the Heisman Trophy on Dec. 14, 2013, in New York.
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Florida State quarterback Jameis Winston poses after winning the Heisman Trophy on Dec. 14, 2013, in New York.

NEW YORK — Jameis Winston left voters no choice but to give him the Heisman Trophy.

The Florida State quarterback became the second straight freshman to win the Heisman on Saturday night, earning college football's most prestigious individual award with a performance so spectacular and dominant that even a criminal investigation couldn't derail his candidacy.

Winston received 668 first-place votes and 2,205 points. He finished 1,501 points ahead of Alabama quarterback AJ McCarron for the seventh-largest margin of victory in Heisman history, despite being left off 115 of the 900 ballots that were returned.

Northern Illinois quarterback Jordan Lynch was third, followed by Boston College's Andre Williams, Texas A&M's Johnny Manziel and Auburn's Tre Mason.

Manziel was the first freshman to win the Heisman and was trying to join Ohio State's Archie Griffin as a two-time Heisman winner. Instead, Winston made it two freshman winners in the 79-year history of the Heisman. He also became the youngest winner at 23 days short of 20.

The 19-year-old also was investigated last month for a year-old sexual assault, but no charges were filed and the case was closed four days before Heisman votes were due.

Winston is the nation's top-rated passer and has led the top-ranked Seminoles to a spot in the BCS championship game against No. 2 Auburn on Jan. 6, his birthday. The former five-star recruit from Bessemer, Ala., made college football look easy from his very first game. On Labor Day night, on national television, Winston went 25 for 27 for 356 yards and four touchdowns in a victory at Pitt.

It was a brilliant debut that lived up to the offseason hype, when Winston wowed FSU fans in the spring football game and on the baseball diamond as a hard-throwing reliever and clutch-hitting outfielder. He had already earned the nickname Famous Jameis before he ever played a college football game. And he quickly became one of the most beloved Seminoles since Charlie Ward, the 1993 Heisman winner.

Winston is the third Seminoles quarterback to win the award, along with Chris Weinke in 2000.

Winston and FSU were cruising toward an undefeated season when news broke of an unresolved sexual assault complaint against him made to the Tallahassee Police Department last December.

The dormant case was handed over to the state attorney's office for a full investigation. A female student at FSU accused Winston of rape. Winston's attorney said the sex was consensual.

During three weeks of uncertainty, Winston continued to play sensationally, especially in Florida State's big games against Clemson and Miami, while other contenders stumbled or failed to distinguish themselves.

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