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Super Bowl — facts and figures

| Monday, Jan. 29, 2018, 2:57 p.m.
REUTERS

While most everyone knows the New England Patriots and Philadelphia Eagles will be vying for the Vince Lombardi Trophy, not as many know who makes the silver trophy.

It's created by Tiffany & Company. The trophy stands 203⁄4 inches tall, weighs 6.7 pounds and is valued more than $25,000.

The history of the Super Bowl — easily the most talked-about sporting event of the year — is full of interesting tidbits.

For instance, U.S. Bank Stadium in Minneapolis is the site of Super Bowl LII. It can hold 66,860 people. But even if they overload the stadium, it won't come close to the largest crowd ever to watch the big game. That happened at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, Calif., for Super Bowl XIV, in which the Steelers defeated the Los Angeles Rams for their fourth trophy in six years. That game had 103,985 fans in the stands.

Here's a few other interesting facts over the years.


Player's share

This year, each player on the winning team gets to take home $112,000; the losers take home $56,000 each. Here's a look back at the players' winnings over the years:

2017: $107,000-$53,000

2016: $102,000-$51,000

2015: $97,000-$49,000

2014: $92,000-$46,000

2013: $88,000-$44,000

2012: $88,000-$44,000

2011: $83,000-$42,000

2010: $83,000-$42,000

2009: $78,000-$40,000

2008: $78,000-$40,000

2007: $78,000-$40,000

2006: $73,000-$38,000

2005: $68,000-$36,500

2004: $68,000-$36,500

2003: $63,000-$35,000

2002: $63,000-$34,500

2001: $58,000-$34,500

2000: $58,000-$33,000

1999: $53,000-$32,500

1998: $48,000-$29,000

1997: $48,000-$29,000

1996: $42,000-$27,000

1995: $42,000-$26,000

1994: $38,000-$23,500

1993: $36,000-$18,000

1992: $36,000-$18,000

1991: $36,000-$18,000

1990: $36,000-$18,000

1989: $36,000-$18,000

1988: $36,000-$18,000

1987: $36,000-$18,000

1986: $36,000-$18,000

1985: $36,000-$18,000

1984: $36,000-$18,000

1983: $36,000-$18,000

1982: $18,000-$9,000

1981: $18,000-$9,000

1980: $18,000-$9,000

1979: $18,000-$9,000

1978: $18,000-$9,000

1977: $15,000-$7,500

1976: $15,000-$7,500

1975: $15,000-$7,500

1974: $15,000-$7,500

1973: $15,000-$7,500

1972: $15,000-$7,500

1971: $15,000-$7,500

1970: $15,000-$7,500

1969: $15,000-$7,500

1968: $15,000-$7,500

1967: $15,000-$7,500


Going to the game

To date, 3,947,121 have attended Super Bowl games. That's a lot of tickets bought — and a lot of money spent by fans. Here's a look at how much a ticket has gone for over the years.

2018: $2,500 to $500 U.S. Bank Stadium, Minneapolis

2017: $2,500 to $500 NRG Stadium, Houston

2016: $2,500 to $500 Levi Stadium, Santa Clara, Calif.

2015: $2,000 to $500 U. of Phoenix Stadium, Glendale, Ariz.

2014: $1,500 to $800 MetLife Stadium, East Rutherford, N.J.

2013: $1,250 to $650 Mercedes-Benz Superdome, New Orleans

2012: $1,200 to $600 Lucas Oil Stadium, Indianapolis

2011: $1,200 to $600 Cowboys Stadium, Arlington, Texas

2010: $1,000 to $500 Sun Life Stadium, Miami

2009: $1,000 to $500 Raymond James Stadium, Tampa, Fla.

2008: $900, $700 U. of Phoenix Stadium, Glendale, Ariz.

2007: $700, $600 Dolphin Stadium, Miami

2006: $700, $600 Ford Field, Detroit

2005: $600, $500 ALLTEL Stadium, Jacksonville, Fla.

2004: $600, $500, $400 Reliant Stadium, Houston

2003: $500, $400 Qualcomm Stadium, San Diego

2002: $400 Superdome, New Orleans

2001: $325 Raymond James Stadium, Tampa, Fla.

2000: $325 Georgia Dome, Atlanta

1999: $325 Pro Player Stadium, Miami

1998: $275 Qualcomm Stadium, San Diego

1997: $275 Superdome, New Orleans

1996: $350, $250, $200 Sun Devil Stadium, Tempe, Ariz.

1995: $200 Joe Robbie Stadium, Miami

1994: $175 Georgia Dome, Atlanta

1993: $175 Rose Bowl, Pasadena, Calif.

1992: $150 Metrodome, Minneapolis

1991: $150 Tampa (Fla.) Stadium

1990: $125 Superdome, New Orleans

1989: $100 Joe Robbie Stadium, Miami

1988: $100 Jack Murphy Stadium, San Diego

1987: $75 Rose Bowl, Pasadena, Calif.

1986: $75 Superdome, New Orleans

1985: $60 Stanford (Calif.) Stadium

1984: $60 Tampa (Fla.) Stadium

1983: $40 Rose Bowl, Pasadena, Calif.

1982: $40 Silverdome, Pontiac, Mich.

1981: $40 Superdome, New Orleans

1980: $30 Rose Bowl, Pasadena, Calif.

1979: $30 Orange Bowl, Miami

1978: $30 Superdome, New Orleans

1977: $20 Rose Bowl, Pasadena, Calif.

1976: $20 Orange Bowl, Miami

1975: $20 Tulane Stadium, New Orleans

1974: $15 Rice Stadium, Houston

1973: $15 Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles

1972: $15 Tulane Stadium, New Orleans

1971: $15 Orange Bowl, Miami

1970: $15 Tulane Stadium, New Orleans

1969: $12 Orange Bowl, Miami

1968: $12 Orange Bowl, Miami

1967: $12, $10, $6 Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles


Ad rates

A 30-second commercial this year is costing advertisers $5 million. That, shockingly, hasn't changed in the past three years. Only a few times over the years has the cost of a 30-second spot gone down year over year. Here's a look at ad prices.

2017: $5 million

2016: $5 million

2015: $4.5 million

2014: $4 million

2013: $3.8 million

2012: $3.5 million

2011: $3.1 million

2010: $2.9 million

2009: $2.8 million

2008: $2.7 million

2007: $2.6 million

2006: $2.5 million

2005: $2.4 million

2004: $2.3 million

2003: $2.1 million

2002: $1.9 million

2001: $2.1 million

2000: $2.2 million

1999: $1.6 million

1998: $1.3 million

1997: $1.2 million

1996: $1.08 million

1995: $1.15 million

1994: $900,000

1993: $850,000

1992: $850,000

1991: $800,000

1990: $700,000

1989: $675,000

1988: $645,000

1987: $600,000

1986: $550,000

1985: $525,000

1984: $368,000

1983: $400,000

1982: $324,000

1981: $275,000

1980: $222,000

1979: $185,000

1978: $162,000

1977: $125,000

1976: $110,000

1975: $107,000

1974: $103,000

1973: $88,000

1972: $86,000

1971: $72,000

1970: $78,000

1969: $55,000

1968: $54,000

1967: $42,000


Halftime

Nowadays, the halftime show at the Super Bowl is just as watched (perhaps more so) than the game itself. But that wasn't always the case. In the early days, the halftime show consisted of marching bands and Up With People performances; it was an afterthought seen only as entertainment for the in-stadium crowd. Here's a look back at who has played the halftime gig.

2018: Justin Timberlake

2017: Lady Gaga

2016: Coldplay, Beyoncé and Bruno Mars

2015: Katy Perry, Lenny Kravitz and Missy Elliot

2014: Bruno Mars and The Red Hot Chili Peppers

2013: Beyonce, Destiny's Child

2012: Madonna

2011: Black Eyed Peas

2010: The Who

2009: Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band

2008: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers

2007: Prince

2006: The Rolling Stones

2005: Paul McCartney

2004: Janet Jackson, Justin Timberlake, P. Diddy, Kid Rock, and Nelly

2003: Shania Twain, No Doubt, and Sting

2002: U2

2001: Aerosmith, 'N'SYNC, Britney Spears, Mary J. Blige and Nelly

2000: Phil Collins, Christina Aguilera, Enrique Iglesias, and Toni Braxton

1999: Stevie Wonder, Gloria Estefan, Big Bad Voodoo Daddy, and Savion Glover

1998: Boyz II Men, Smokey Robinson, Martha Reeves, The Temptations and Queen Latifah

1997: Blues Brothers, James Brown and ZZ Top

1996: Diana Ross

1995: Tony Bennett, Patti LaBelle, Arturo Sandoval and Miami Sound Machine

1994: Clint Black, Tanya Tucker, Travis Tritt, Wynonna & Naomi Judd

1993: Michael Jackson

1992: Gloria Estefan, Brian Boitano and Dorothy Hamill

1991: New Kids on the Block

1990: Pete Fountain, Doug Kershaw and Irma Thomas

1989: South Florida-area dancers and performers

1988: Chubby Checker and The Rockettes

1987: Southern California-area high school drill teams and dancers

1986: Up With People

1985: U.S. Air Force Band

1984: University of Florida and Florida State University Bands

1983: Los Angeles Super Drill Team

1982: Up With People

1981: Southern University Band, Helen O'Connell

1980: Up with People

1979: Ken Hamilton and Caribbean bands

1978: Tyler Apache Belles, Pete Fountain and Al Hirt

1977: Los Angeles Unified All-City Band

1976: Up With People

1975: Mercer Ellington and Grambling State University marching bands

1974: University of Texas Longhorn Band

1973: University of Michigan Marching Band, Woody Herman and Andy Williams

1972: Ella Fitzgerald, Carol Channing, Al Hirt, USAFA Cadet Chorale, U.S. Marine Corps Drill Team

1971: Southeast Missouri State Marching Band, Up With People

1970: Marguerite Piazza, Doc Severinsen, Al Hirt, Lionel Hampton Southern University Marching Band

1969: Florida A&M University and Miami-area high-school bands

1968: Grambling State University Marching Band

1967: University of Arizona Symphonic Marching Band and Grambling State University Marching Band

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