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Eagles center Jason Kelce's rant highlights Super Bowl parade

Samson X Horne
| Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018, 8:07 p.m.
Philadelphia Eagles center Jason Kelce speaks in front of the Philadelphia Museum of Art after a Super Bowl victory parade for the Philadelphia Eagles football team, Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018, in Philadelphia.
Philadelphia Eagles center Jason Kelce speaks in front of the Philadelphia Museum of Art after a Super Bowl victory parade for the Philadelphia Eagles football team, Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018, in Philadelphia.
Philadelphia Eagles center Jason Kelce, right, arrives in front of the Philadelphia Museum of Art after a Super Bowl victory parade for the Philadelphia Eagleson Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018, in Philadelphia.
Philadelphia Eagles center Jason Kelce, right, arrives in front of the Philadelphia Museum of Art after a Super Bowl victory parade for the Philadelphia Eagleson Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018, in Philadelphia.

Philadelphia Eagles center Jason Kelce made no bones about it Thursday: His team relished the role of underdog in Super Bowl LII.

At the raucous, emotional parade, Kelce — who was dressed in a green matador jacket and a white sultan's hat with green stripes­ — addressed hundreds of thousands of partying fans who jammed the freezing streets leading to the city's famed "Rocky" steps, to revel in an NFL title many thought would never come.

Taking a page from Hall of Fame pro wrestler "Stone Cold" Steve Austin, Kelce started: "If you love the Eagles, let me get a hell yeah!"

In a nearly five-minute rant, Kelce highlighted many of the things critics of the Eagles thought would go wrong: coach Doug Pederson was considered the "worst coaching hire" by an analyst; running back Jay Ajayi wouldn't stay healthy; Nelson Agholor can't catch; others assumed Kelce was too small to play center in the NFL; and of course, backup quarterback Nick Foles couldn't cut it against New England's Tom Brady.

The list went on.

Keeping in touch with the Stone Cold theme, the crowd turned Kelce's rhetoric into a call-and-response speech replying with a sarcastic "What?" every time Kelce listed said issues.

Of Pederson, an emphatic Kelce said, "He wasn't playing to be mediocre, he was playing for the Super Bowl!"

Kelce said the team wasn't worried about what one particular person could­ or couldn't do, but focused on the Eagles' collective effort.

"It's the whole team," Kelce said. "We wanted it more."

The lineman also shared these sage words: "An underdog is a hungry dog. And hungry dogs run faster."

Kelce finished his rant about how you would expect someone in "The City of Brotherly Love" to conclude: with expletives.

The parade caps a glorious week for jubilant fans celebrating an NFL title that had eluded them for nearly 60 years. Led by the backup quarterback Foles and second-year coach Pederson, the Eagles beat the New England Patriots, 41-33, on Sunday night.

Samson X Horne is a digtal produce for Trib Total Media. Follow him on Twitter @spinal_tapp.

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