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NHL

In most boring video ever, deadpan NHL players reveal favorite cliches

Matt Rosenberg
| Tuesday, Jan. 8, 2019, 2:06 p.m.
Penguins goaltender Marc-Andre Fleury speaks to the media in the locker room Thursday, May 15, 2014, at Consol Energy Center.
Chaz Palla | Tribune-Review
Penguins goaltender Marc-Andre Fleury speaks to the media in the locker room Thursday, May 15, 2014, at Consol Energy Center.

Try to stay awake, if you can.

It's not secret that NHL players are absurdly cliche during their interviews.

And they're not about to shy away from that.

In a nearly three-minute video, a collection of NHL players including Marc-Andre Fleury, Jack Eichel, Connor McDavid and others were asked what their favorite cliches are.

And trust us, they are well-aware of how boring they can be.

There are no surprises here. It's as gloriously cliche-filled as you could expect. Like any locker-room scrum you've ever seen.

You know the ones:

• "Play our game."

• "Got off to a slow start."

• "Give them credit."

• "It was a good team effort."

• "Good teams find a way to win."

Shout out to Islanders captain Anders Lee, who not only dished on his favorite cliche but also was brutally honest about them.

"Whoever the goalie is played awesome. Everyone kind of rolls through the lines," he said. "They're all cliche. All of them. The whole entire interview."

Yeah, tell us about it.

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