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Olympics

High winds wreaking havoc on Olympic venues, postponing events

Matt Rosenberg
| Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018, 8:27 a.m.
A spectators wearing the colors of the Dutch Royal House of Orange, holds on to his hat as fierce wind blows outside the Gangneung Oval at the 2018 Winter Olympics in Gangneung, South Korea, Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018.
A spectators wearing the colors of the Dutch Royal House of Orange, holds on to his hat as fierce wind blows outside the Gangneung Oval at the 2018 Winter Olympics in Gangneung, South Korea, Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018.
A volunteer gathers plastic chairs blown over by fierce wind at the Gangneung Media Village in Gangneung, South Korea, Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018.
A volunteer gathers plastic chairs blown over by fierce wind at the Gangneung Media Village in Gangneung, South Korea, Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018.
Olympic workers take cover from extreme wind gusts at the media village at the 2018 Winter Games in Gangneung, South Korea on Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018.
Olympic workers take cover from extreme wind gusts at the media village at the 2018 Winter Games in Gangneung, South Korea on Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018.
Sweden's Anna Magnusson aims her rifle amidst a gust of snow and wind during a women's official training session, at the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea, Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018.
Sweden's Anna Magnusson aims her rifle amidst a gust of snow and wind during a women's official training session, at the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea, Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018.
A course gate is blown by the wind during the men's alpine combined downhill on Day 4 of the PyeongChang 2018 Winter Olympic Games at Jeongseon Alpine Centre on Feb. 13, 2018.
Getty Images
A course gate is blown by the wind during the men's alpine combined downhill on Day 4 of the PyeongChang 2018 Winter Olympic Games at Jeongseon Alpine Centre on Feb. 13, 2018.

Yeah, it's windy.

The weather has been among the hottest (coldest) topics of conversation surrounding the Pyeongchang Olympics, and gusty winds are continuing to wreak havoc on the slopes and posing dangers to athletes and spectators.

USA Today reported attendees inside Olympic Park were asked to move indoors Wednesday morning. High winds were shaking tents, concession stands and media rooms.

A souvenir and clothing stand also was closed.

"Due to high winds in the Gangneung area, all activities in the common domain of the Gangneung Olympic Park have been temporarily been suspended to ensure the safety of all personnel," the Pyeongchang organizing committee said in a statement. "Spectators are being encouraged to stay indoors and general admission to the park has been suspended for the remainder of the day."

Women's slalom was canceled on Wednesday morning after being rescheduled four times. The event was moved to Friday because of high winds and poor visibility.

The Associated Press reported men's downhill skiing will be Thursday — four days later than planned.

Calm air and cloudy skies are forecast for Jeongseon, where the snow surface is harder and faster after a pounding by strong winds since Sunday's original start date was postponed.

Winds had gusted to upward of 45 mph.

#WindyOlympics

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"Everyone is like: 'Are you waiting around?' You're not really waiting, because you're keeping yourself — body and mind — ready to go," U.S. racer Megan McJames said. "You're training on snow. Dry land training. Physical therapy. Everything you'd do on a normal day to keep yourself in the best possible position to compete."

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