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Olympics

Double-amputee Pistorius earns spot in Olympics

| Wednesday, July 4, 2012, 7:54 p.m.

Never count out Oscar Pistorius.

The Blade Runner will be competing in the London Olympics after all, in his favorite event, the 400 meters.

While his selection for the 1,600 relay team was expected, it was a surprise last-minute turnaround by South African sports officials Wednesday that gave Pistorius the chance to run the 400.

With the decision, the 25-year-old will become the first amputee track athlete to compete at any Games.

“Today is truly one of the proudest days of my life,” said Pistorius, a double amputee who spent his entire track career trying to prove he's good enough to compete with the best.

He now has the chance to do just that.

South Africa's Olympic committee and national track federation suddenly decided to clear Pistorius for the 400 at the London Games on his carbon fiber blades despite him just missing out on the country's strict qualifying criteria.

Men's basketball

Chicago Bulls center Joakim Noah will not play for France because of a left ankle injury.

“I'm absolutely not ready,” Noah said in Wednesday's edition of L'Equipe newspaper. “Not ready to run, not ready to jump. And even less to play.”

Noah said he needs more time to recover completely.

“I'm not in the form of someone bidding to compete in the Olympics,” he said. “And given the problems that I have with my ankles, not going to the Olympics seemed to be the most reasonable decision.”

U.S. will wait

The U.S. Olympic Committee said it will bypass the chance to host the 2022 Winter Games in favor of forming a panel of board members to recommend a bid strategy for the '24 and '26 Olympics.

The U.S. last hosted the Summer Olympics in 1996 in Atlanta and the Winter Olympics in 2002 in Salt Lake City.

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