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Penguins

Phil Kessel on gold-medal winning sister Amanda: 'I'm very proud of her'

Chris Adamski
| Thursday, Feb. 22, 2018, 1:24 p.m.

That he had to be at work just a few hours later didn't stop Phil Kessel from staying up late Wednesday night.

Going to be bed well past 2 a.m. was well worth the wait for the Penguins forward. After all, how many chances does one get to watch a sibling win an Olympic gold medal?

"Obviously, I was nervous," Phil Kessel said of watching Team USA's 3-2 shootout win against Canada in South Korea . "It was a tight game."

Amanda Kessel had a game-saving shootout goal in the victory, the American women's first in the Olympics against their northern rivals since they claimed the first women's hockey Olympic gold in 1998.

The Canadians had won the past four Olympic gold medals, including 2014 in Sochi, Russia, when Amanda and Team USA blew a late lead to lose in overtime in Canada. The roles were reversed Thursday, with the Americans coming back from a third-period deficit.

"I think (Amanda) can't believe it," said Phil Kessel, who said he talked to his sister before and after the game. "They worked so hard. The girls worked so hard to get there. It's every four years, and that's the biggest game they get a chance to play in. It's a great accomplishment."

The triumph was especially sweet for Amanda Kessel, who'd missed about two years of competitive hockey because of a concussion.

"I'm very proud of her," Phil said. "She missed a lot of time with her concussion and stuff. And to be able to win a gold medal, it's a special accomplishment and I'm really proud of her."

The gold medal follows consecutive Stanley Cup victories for Phil the past two summers.

"It's been a good run (for the family)," Phil said. "Hopefully we can keep it going."

Chris Adamski is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at cadamski@tribweb.com or via Twitter @C_AdamskiTrib.

USA's Amanda Kessel (L) scores against Canada's Shannon Szabados during the penalty-shot shootout in the women's gold medal ice hockey match between the US and Canada during the Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Olympic Games at the Gangneung Hockey Centre in Gangneung on February 22, 2018.   / AFP PHOTO / Brendan SMIALOWSKIBRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images
AFP/Getty Images
USA's Amanda Kessel (L) scores against Canada's Shannon Szabados during the penalty-shot shootout in the women's gold medal ice hockey match between the US and Canada during the Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Olympic Games at the Gangneung Hockey Centre in Gangneung on February 22, 2018. / AFP PHOTO / Brendan SMIALOWSKIBRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images
USA's Amanda Kessel (centre L) is hugged by teammate Lee Stecklein (centre R) after the medal ceremony after the US team won the gold in the women's ice hockey event during the Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Olympic Games at the Gangneung Hockey Centre in Gangneung on February 22, 2018.   / AFP PHOTO / Brendan SmialowskiBRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images
AFP/Getty Images
USA's Amanda Kessel (centre L) is hugged by teammate Lee Stecklein (centre R) after the medal ceremony after the US team won the gold in the women's ice hockey event during the Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Olympic Games at the Gangneung Hockey Centre in Gangneung on February 22, 2018. / AFP PHOTO / Brendan SmialowskiBRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images
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