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Kevin Gorman's Take 5: Five thoughts on Penguins 5, Flyers 1 in Game 3

Kevin Gorman
| Sunday, April 15, 2018, 5:55 p.m.
Sidney Crosby #87 of the Pittsburgh Penguins scores at 10:25 of the first period against Brian Elliott #37 of the Philadelphia Flyers in Game Three of the Eastern Conference First Round during the 2018 NHL Stanley Cup Playoffs at the Wells Fargo Center on April 15, 2018 in Philadelphia.
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Sidney Crosby #87 of the Pittsburgh Penguins scores at 10:25 of the first period against Brian Elliott #37 of the Philadelphia Flyers in Game Three of the Eastern Conference First Round during the 2018 NHL Stanley Cup Playoffs at the Wells Fargo Center on April 15, 2018 in Philadelphia.
The Penguins' Matt Murray make a first-period save on Scott Laughton of the Flyers in Game 3 on April 15, 2018, in Philadelphia.
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The Penguins' Matt Murray make a first-period save on Scott Laughton of the Flyers in Game 3 on April 15, 2018, in Philadelphia.
Matt Murray of the Penguins keeps his eyes on the play during the first period against the Flyers in Game 3 on April 15, 2018, in Philadelphia.
Getty Images
Matt Murray of the Penguins keeps his eyes on the play during the first period against the Flyers in Game 3 on April 15, 2018, in Philadelphia.
Linesman Derek Nansen gets between Kris Letang of the Penguins and Scott Laughton of the Flyers during the second period in Game 3 on April 15, 2018, in Philadelphia.
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Linesman Derek Nansen gets between Kris Letang of the Penguins and Scott Laughton of the Flyers during the second period in Game 3 on April 15, 2018, in Philadelphia.

PHILADELPHIA — Five quick thoughts on Game 3 between the Penguins and Flyers:

1. Great in goal

Fresh off a 5-1 Game 2 victory and in their playoff home debut, the Flyers came out fast in the first period.

And Matt Murray was ready Sunday.

The Penguins goalie stoned a Nolan Patrick breakaway with a glove save, blocked Travis Sanheim after a cross-ice pass from Jori Lehtera and stopped a Scott Laughton wrister before the Penguins attempted their first official shot on goal.

Where Murray followed the Game 1 shutout by allowing a goal in the final minute of the first period in Game 2, the Penguins killed a pair of penalties in Game 3.

The Flyers had several scrambles around the net. But after allowing five goals on 19 shots Friday night, Murray stopped everything that came at him. The Penguins weathered that storm, including a PK in the final 1:43.

Turns out, they took the Flyers' best shot and came out clean.

2. Crosby shoots and scores

Sidney Crosby followed a hat trick in Game 1 by missing three great scoring chances in Game 2, including a second-period breakaway and a point-blank shot.

As accustomed, Flyers fans at Wells Fargo Center delighted in chanting "Crosby sucks!" just before the opening faceoff.

As accustomed, Crosby silenced the Philly crowd.

After a Michael Raffl turnover, the puck bounced to Patric Hornqvist in the slot. Hornqvist passed to Crosby, who played it off his skate to the left of the post and scored a wraparound goal for a 1-0 lead at 10 minutes, 25 seconds of the first period.

The most amazing part isn't that it was Crosby's fourth goal of the playoffs. It's that he could/should have seven.

3. Proving his point

Through the first two games of this series, Phil Kessel was practically invisible — at least, on the score sheet.

Before the game, Penguins radio analyst Phil Bourque dropped some serious statistics about Kessel, noting he went scoreless only four times this season.

One of those was in Game 1, the first time at home this season Kessel failed to register a shot on goal.

But Kessel was in danger of going three games without a point for the first time since a stretch from Feb. 15-18.

Penguins coach Mike Sullivan didn't seem concerned before Game 3, saying Kessel has been "in this situation at lot and knows how to respond."

The Penguins went to great lengths to set Kessel up for a wrister from the left circle on their first power play, but Flyers goalie Brian Elliott made a glove save.

On the second power play, after Kris Letang's shot went off Elliott's pads and Kessel fed Derick Brassard for a shot from the left circle for a 2-0 lead at 2:48 of the second period.

Kessel got his point across, with an assist.

4. A game decision

Sullivan was being coy when asked about Letang's availability just two hours before Game 3, saying "all of our players are game-time decisions."

The Penguins had no apprehension with playing Letang, despite the Game 2 second-period collision with Claude Giroux that caused a cut on his hand and concerns of a concussion.

Sullivan said Letang didn't require concussion protocol, and called his absence at Saturday's practice a maintenance day.

Not only did Letang get a secondary assist on Brassard's goal but Letang also set up Evgeni Malkin's 4-on-3 goal at 6:48 of the second period for a 3-0 lead.

Letang appears to be just fine.

5. That was fast

Defenseman Brian Dumoulin followed Malkin's goal with one of his own only five seconds later.

Not only did Dumoulin become the 13th Penguins player to score a goal against the Flyers this season, but it was a franchise record for fastest back-to-back goals in a playoff game.

The old record, set by Ron Stackhouse and Rick Kehoe against Boston in 1980, stood for 38 years.

When Justin Schultz added a power-play goal in the third period, he became the 14th Penguins player to score against the Flyers. If you're counting, only Letang, Zach Aston-Reese, Olli Maatta, Chad Ruhwedel and Riley Sheahan haven't scored against the Flyers this season.

There's still time.

Kevin Gorman is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at kgorman@tribweb.com or via Twitter @KGorman_Trib.

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